‘Gabriele D’Annunzio never met an adverb he didn’t like’

TLS_Beard_396117kThat’s the opening sentence of a review by Joseph Luzzi of a recent translation of D’Annunzio’s Pleasure in this week’s Times Literary Supplement (3 Jan 2014). Apart from this review which chimes in with the recent post on D’Annunzio by Stefano Bragato, the issue has other pieces of interest to Italianists. Focusing on the relation between art and power, Mary Beard compares the celebrations of the 2000th anniversary of the birth (63 BC) of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus, by Mussolini in 1937 (the Mostra Augustea della Romanità) with the current exhibition in Rome to celebrate the 2000th anniversary of his death (14 AD), more soberly entitled Augusto. Then Joe Farrell reviews a translation of The Childhood Memories and Other Stories by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa (the author said that no one would ever read those memories, sharing the misplaced confidence of many writers that their juvenilia, private correspondence and laundry lists will never be made public). And, for comparative literature specialists, there is also an extended review of Franco Moretti’s two recent books, Distant Reading and The Bourgeois.

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One thought on “‘Gabriele D’Annunzio never met an adverb he didn’t like’

  1. DM says:

    The New York Review of Books (March 6, 2014, pp.21-2) has a long, favourable review by David Gilmour of Lucy Hughes-Hallett’s recent biography of the Pike. Opening with Liane de Pougy’s description of D’Annunzio – ‘a frightful gnome with red-rimmed eyes and no eyelashes, no hair, greenish teeth, bad breath [and] the manners of a mountebank’, Gilmour provides a more balanced and interesting assessment than he usually receives.

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