Tag Archives: Venice

Jo-Anne Duggan Essay Prize 2015

Jo-Anne Duggan Essay Prize PosterWe are delighted to announce the outcome of the inaugural Jo-Anne Duggan Essay Prize sponsored by ACIS. The winner is Sally Grant, ECR (PhD, University of Sydney, 2013) for her essay on ‘The Eighteenth-Century Experience of the Veneto Country House: Andrea Urbani’s Decoration of Villa Vendramin Calergi’s Room of the Gardens’. Two entrants were highly commended: Crystal Filep (PhD candidate, University of Otago) for her creative work and exegesis ‘Intersection Unbounded’ and Kyra Giorgi, ECR (PhD, La Trobe University, 2013) for her essay ‘La speranza: Spaces of hoping, waiting and dreaming in Italian migration’.  The Panel for the Prize has provided the following summaries of the three entries …. Continue reading

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Transnational Italian Studies: Summer School in Venice, 21-24 September 2015

logo_withtextThe Transnationalizing Modern Languages project, based at the University of Warwick, invites applications from PhD students for its upcoming Summer School Transnational Italian Studies to be held in Venice, 21-24 September 2015. The Summer School provides an intensive four-day learning experience for a maximum of 15 students  interested in the study of Italian language and culture from a transnational perspective. The program consists of master-classes, lectures and roundtables given by international experts, as well as sessions in which students will have the opportunity to share their research and gain feedback from lecturers and peers. Participants will be presented with an array of innovative theoretical and methodological instruments which will enable them to analyse linguistic and cultural exchanges with a specific focus on modern Italy. They will also undertake a small research project in sites around Venice to put  these new tools into practice.

Bursaries covering accommodation expenses, lunch and tuition fees will be available. Further details on the course and the application procedure can be found here. The application deadline is 30 April 2015.
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Alla Venetiana

imagesFor those readers who did not receive invitations to George’s wedding in Venice, here are a couple of consolation prizes. Richard Bosworth’s latest book, Italian Venice: A History (Yale UP, 2014), offers a characteristically engaging account of the city since the fall of the Republic in 1797, covering inter alia the most significant contemporary issues: the threat of flooding, the festivals, tourism. A very different view of the city is presented by the philosopher Philip Kitcher whose Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach (Columbia UP, 2013), takes Thomas Mann’s novella as an entry point to an exploration of the general relations between literature and philosophy.

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Eighteenth-Century Venetian Drawings in New York

Sally Grant   New York

tiepolo_1997_27_2The recent post on Angelo Cattaneo’s upcoming paper got me thinking about Venice. Having recently completed my PhD at the University of Sydney on eighteenth-century Venetian gardens and villa culture, the city and its territory are never far from my thoughts. Recently, however, I was lucky enough to see a wonderful exhibition, ‘Tiepolo, Guardi, and Their World: Eighteenth-Century Venetian Drawings’, at the Pierpont Morgan Library in NYC, where I now live.

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Re-Creating the World in Renaissance Venice

250px-FraMauroDetailedMapDr Angelo Cattaneo (University of Lisbon / Villa I Tatti Fellow 2013-2014) will be giving a paper, Re-Creating the World in Renaissance Venice: Fra Mauro’s Mappa mundi, Marco Polo’s Milione, and the Dawn of the European Expansionon Friday 21 February 2014 at 3.15 pm in room 209 (seminar room 1), Old Arts, The University of Melbourne. Fra Mauro’s world map was designed around 1450 at the Camaldolese monastery of San Michele on Murano in the lagoon of Venice. The map contains three thousand inscriptions and hundreds of images, representing cities, temples, funerary monuments, trade roots, and ships, as well as a scene in the lower left corner representing Earthly Paradise.

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Of Coffee, Cakes, and an Obligatory Saint

Catherine Kovesi  University of Melbourne

Bassrelief of San Martino on the Oratory of the Scuola of San Martino

Bassrelief of San Martino on the Oratory of the Scuola of San Martino

Throughout most of the westernised world we have just celebrated the festival of Halloween. Each year many protest the intrusion of what they see as an Americanised festival into their indigenous traditions, and it did look a little anachronistic here in Venice to see Halloween paraphernalia in many shop windows. But now, barely a fortnight later, the windows are full of paraphernalia for a different and delightful festival here in the city, one with many similarities to Halloween in the ways in which it is celebrated by the children of Venice, but which is completely enmeshed in Venetian tradition. This is the Feast of San Martino, celebrated on 11 November for at least three centuries now.

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‘Madonna dei Bagni … Prega per noi.’

Catherine Kovesi   University of Melbourne

P1020061Wandering along the banchette of one of Venice’s regular mercati antiquari the other day, my eye was caught by a lovely little tazza di caffé. Turning it over, I saw that it was by Ginori, and I felt a little pang that I couldn’t fork out the 40 euros that the stall owner wanted for it.

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Sexy e complicato

podcast(Regretful disclosure: not my title, but the one SBS has used to publicise today’s talk by Andrea Rizzi discussing the beautiful exhibition ‘Libri: 6 Centuries of Italian Books‘ at the Baillieu library of the University of Melbourne). The exhibition closes shortly but a selection will remain online.  Andrea’s focus is particularly on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, published in 1499 in Venice by Aldus Manutius; and he provides a full explanation of exactly what was sexy and complicated about the story (yes, available uncensored on Amazon).

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Lucrezia Marinella’s ‘Essortationi alle donne et a gli altri’: construction of an early modern self

Amy Sinclair   University of Melbourne

The concept of self-fashioning has developed into an important area of Renaissance scholarship, yet rarely has it been considered in gendered terms. Most research has focused on analysing male-authored texts for insights into shifting perceptions of the self and identity.Title Page - Essortationi My aim is to contribute to this important discussion by introducing a Renaissance woman’s voice into the conversation through an examination of Lucrezia Marinella’s 17th century conduct book, Essortationi alle donne et a gli altri, se a loro saranno a grado (1645). Specifically, I’m interested in exploring what the work can tell us about Renaissance self-fashioning by analyzing the construction and representation of self in discourse and the role of gender in these processes. I also analyse the way in which Marinella uses personal pronouns and the language of self-reference to understand how discourses make manifest and shape that identity construction process. And, to identify what is individual and what is general,  I locate her work in the context of a corpus of approximately 50 excerpts from the conduct literature of the period.

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Blogs we like #4

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Latent pyromaniacs who eagerly clicked on the Let us burn the gondolas link in Andrea Rizzi’s post on Venice (10 February) were taken to a beautiful and thought-provoking photographic essay on the city.  Its author, Jonathan Walker, is a former Senior Research Fellow at Sydney University, biographer of a Venetian spy, and novelist. He has also been a volunteer in a community for homeless men, security guard, postman, census-taker, bill-poster and (for one possibly glorious, evidently  unrepeatable, evening) theatre usher. He writes a blog Blog Image 2with a strong interest in Venice and Venetians which also covers his other interests in literature, card games, comic books, photography, cinema and contemporary music. No Italianist, and no one interested in the above topics, should miss it.

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