Tag Archives: Renaissance

‘Tied with indissoluble chains’: Languages of Exile and Imprisonment

Lisa Di Crescenzo/Sally Fisher   Monash University

CMRS The inaugural Annual Symposium of Monash University’s Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (CMRS),'”Tied with indissoluble chains”: Languages of Exile and Imprisonment in Medieval and Renaissance England and Italy’, was held at Monash University on 24 April 2015. The theme was born out of shared research interests, and the enthusiastic response from speakers and participants confirmed both scholarly and general interest in a sustained enquiry into languages of exile and imprisonment in Medieval and Renaissance England and Italy. Susan Broomhall (UWA) gave the plenary address, followed by Stephanie Downes (Melbourne), Helen Hickey (Melbourne), Amanda McVitty (Massey University, NZ) and Natalie Tomas (Monash). Papers by Lisa Di Crescenzo and Sally Fisher completed the programme. Analysing sources such as letters, legal documents, chronicles and poems, the speakers interrogated the writing of the experiences of exile and imprisonment in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century England and Italy, exploring how the physical and interior experiences of these states were negotiated, reshaped and performed, and the intersections and oppositions between them.

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Renaissance credit/Mafia organisation

EUR55_02Full disclosure: there is no relation between the two topics in the title above except their appearance in the same recent issue of the Archives Européennes de Sociologie/European Journal of Sociology (2014, v.55, no.2). In ‘The circulation of interpersonal credit in Renaissance Florence’ Paul McLean and Neha Gondal analyze a large network of interpersonal credit ties among Renaissance Florentine élite households to determine how Florentine personal credit was organised. After examining participation by people from different categories (neighborhoods, factions, and guilds), they conclude that use of credit provided an important mechanism for confirming élite membership and solidarity. In ‘How Do Mafias Organise? Conflict and Violence in Three Mafia Organizations’ Maurizio Catino tracks the relationship between organisational structure and type of criminal behaviour in Cosa Nostra, Camorra, and ‘Ndrangheta. Using historical, judicial and statistical evidence, he shows how differences in the degree of organisational hierarchy produce differences in both levels and targets of violence.

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Inaugural CMRS symposium: Monash University, 24 April 2015, 9.15-4.30

Lorenzo_di_Credi_woman_Metropolitan-detail-640x400The inaugural Annual Symposium of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Monash University is entitled ‘”Tied with indissoluble chains”: Languages of Exile and Imprisonment in Medieval and Renaissance England and Italy’ and will take place at the Monash Club, Monash University, Clayton, on Friday 24 April 2015 from 9:15 to 4:30pm. The plenary speaker willl be Susan Broomhall (UWA). Details of the event, other speakers and registration can be found here (STOP PRESS: registrations are now closed because of the excellent response but anyone wanting more details of the programme and theme is welcome to contact the convenors, Lisa Di Crescenzo and Sally Fisher).

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Early Modern Luxury, Greed, Ethics: Conference at Villa I Tatti, 25-26 Sept

itatti_logoThis conference, Luxury and the Ethics of Greed in the Early Modern World, will take place at the Villa I Tatti on 25-26 September 2014. It will unravel the complex interaction of the competing paradigms of luxury and greed, which lie at the origins of modern consumption practices. In the western world the phenomenon of luxury and the ethical dilemmas it raised appeared, for the first time since antiquity, in Renaissance Italy. Here luxury emerged as a core idea in the conceptualization of consumption. Simultaneously greed, manifested in new, unrestrained consumption practices, came under close ethical scrutiny. Other European countries soon followed suit, and similar debates emerged in Ming China with the twin concepts of schechi and shemi. As the buying power of new classes gained pace, these paradigms evolved as they continued to inform emerging global cultures through the Early Modern period. Speakers and their abstracts can be found here.

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Harvard I Tatti Prize for article on Renaissance topic by junior scholar

itatti_logoThis annual prize – deadline 6 June but with a very simple application form – is awarded to a junior scholar for the best scholarly article on an Italian Renaissance topic, published in English or Italian. The subject can be any aspect of the Italian Renaissance, broadly defined as the period ranging from the 13th to the 17th centuries, and including historiography.  The winning article(s) will be posted on the I Tatti website and the author will receive $1,000. The guidelines follow …

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Re-Creating the World in Renaissance Venice

250px-FraMauroDetailedMapDr Angelo Cattaneo (University of Lisbon / Villa I Tatti Fellow 2013-2014) will be giving a paper, Re-Creating the World in Renaissance Venice: Fra Mauro’s Mappa mundi, Marco Polo’s Milione, and the Dawn of the European Expansionon Friday 21 February 2014 at 3.15 pm in room 209 (seminar room 1), Old Arts, The University of Melbourne. Fra Mauro’s world map was designed around 1450 at the Camaldolese monastery of San Michele on Murano in the lagoon of Venice. The map contains three thousand inscriptions and hundreds of images, representing cities, temples, funerary monuments, trade roots, and ships, as well as a scene in the lower left corner representing Earthly Paradise.

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Prof Martin McLaughlin at Monash University: three key events in September and October

Martin

Italian Studies and RISM at Monash University are pleased to announce the visit of Prof Martin McLaughlin (University of Oxford) who will join us for two weeks at the end of September as Distinguished Visiting Scholar. During his visit Prof McLaughlin will give the following public lecture to which everyone is warmly invited and which will take place at the Monash Caulfield Campus, room S/S230 on TUESDAY OCTOBER 1, at 5.30pm.

Calvino, Eco and the transforming power of world literature

Italo Calvino and Umberto Eco wrote many essays on world literature, so much so that they would both have been major literary critics even if they had not written any novels.

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Sexy e complicato

podcast(Regretful disclosure: not my title, but the one SBS has used to publicise today’s talk by Andrea Rizzi discussing the beautiful exhibition ‘Libri: 6 Centuries of Italian Books‘ at the Baillieu library of the University of Melbourne). The exhibition closes shortly but a selection will remain online.  Andrea’s focus is particularly on the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, published in 1499 in Venice by Aldus Manutius; and he provides a full explanation of exactly what was sexy and complicated about the story (yes, available uncensored on Amazon).

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Michael Wyatt’s talks in Melbourne

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Sept. 16  University of Melbourne, Department of Italian: “Italian Renaissance Technologies: Praxis, Texts, Images” (click here for details)

Sept. 20  Monash University, Med-Ren seminar: ‘Renaissances: an introduction to the Cambridge Companion to the Italian Renaissance’ (click here for details)

 

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Michael Wyatt’s talks in Sydney, Newcastle and Adelaide

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Sept. 5   University of Sydney, Dept. of Italian Studies: “Italian Renaissance Technologies: Praxis, Texts, Images”

Sept. 6   University of Newcastle, School of Humanities and Social Science: “John Florio’s Montaigne and the End of Renaissance Humanism”

Sept. 11 Flinders University, Department of Language Studies, Italian Section, Adelaide: “Astolfo, ‘Il duca inglese’, Knight of Charlemagne and Literary Chameleon”

More details on Michael and his talk (where and when) at Flinders can be found here.

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