Tag Archives: music

Senses of Italy: Melbourne Masterclass

Scent, sight, sound, taste, touch: all Italian-style. They are covered in a programme of Thursday evening lectures, Melbourne Masterclass : Senses of Italy, at the University of Melbourne, 6.15 – 8.15pm, 5 October – 2 November 2017. The series starts with Catherine Kovesi on Renaissance perfumes (Venice as olfactory heaven) and Antonio Artese on scent and Aquaflor (5 Oct). Then Christopher Marshall looks at Artemisia Gentileschi’s correspondence (‘it’s all about the money’) and Mark Nicholls at Rossellini’s Voyage to Italy (12 Oct). John Weretka uses paintings and poetry to examine the instruments, repertoires and status of Renaissance musicians (upwardly mobile), followed by Malcolm Angelucci on poetics, music and madness in Italy before 1914 (19 Oct). John Hajek and Anthony White consider Futurism and food, the art and appetites of the antigrazioso (26 Oct). Finally Andrea Rizzi explores the ideas and images of Renaissance texts (‘tactile values’), and Carl Villis reveals some attributions and reattributions of Italian Renaissance art in the National Gallery of Victoria (2 Nov). Further details on the contributions, authors, venue and registration can be found here.

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New Honorary Research Associates

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ACIS is very pleased that Josh Brown and Alessandro Carrieri have accepted appointments as Honorary Research Associates. Dr Brown has interests in language in both historical and contemporary contexts. Using materials from the archives of merchants, he has analysed variations in language use in 14thC and 15thC Milan; he has written on the life and letters of a cardinal in mid-19thC Western Australia; and he has explored factors in Italian language enrolments in current tertiary education. Dr Carrieri, whose doctoral research was on music, memory and resistance among Jewish musicians in concentration camps and ghettos, has been a Visiting Research Fellow in Holocaust Studies at the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation (Monash). His current research concerns the history of the persecution and expulsion of Italian Jewish musicians and composers from conservatories and theatres during Fascist rule; he has recently organised a conference in Trieste on that topic.

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Italian Jewish Musicians and Composers during Fascism

9885024_origThere are voices of musicians that still remain unheard but will remain alive forever. This is the case of Jewish musicians and composers in Fascist and Nazi-Fascist Italy who were excluded from theatres, orchestras and music conservatories and whose compositions were banned as ‘degenerate music’. Their experiences and their fate (exclusion, persecution, emigration) will be the theme of an international conference, Italian Jewish Musicians and Composers during Fascism, organized by the Festival Viktor Ullmann and the University of Trieste with the collaboration of the Fondazione Teatro Lirico Giuseppe Verdi, to be held on 26 October 2015. Scholars from different disciplinary fields will examine the relation between the racist phases of Fascism and the lives and works of Jewish composers and musicians. The conference will also host a round table with relatives and students of the persecuted musicians and composers, who will offer their direct testimonies and memories. Continue reading

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RISM seminar (19 March): Alessandro Carrieri on Jewish musicians in Fascist Italy

la difesa della razzaAs the first contribution to the RISM/Italian Studies in the Community seminars for 2015 Alessandro Carrieri will talk on Memory and resistance of Jewish musicians in Fascist Italy on March 19 at 5.30 pm at Monash Caulfield Campus, Building H, Room HB36.

There are voices of resistance that are little heard but will remain alive forever. This is the case of Italian Jewish musicians and composers in Fascist Italy. The announcement of racial (racist) laws by Benito Mussolini in Trieste on 18 September 1938 covered Jewish composers, notably Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Renzo Massarani, Vittorio Rieti, Aldo Finzi and Leone Sinigaglia. Their situation gradually worsened, they were excluded by theatres, orchestras and music conservatories, and their works were banned as examples of ‘degenerate music’.

Continue reading

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