Tag Archives: Museo Italiano

Machiavelli in the British Isles

PETRINA JKT(240x159)PATHIn the century before the first printed English translation of Machiavelli’s The Prince appeared in 1640, at least four translations in English had circulated in manuscript form. The only one which was not anonymous was produced in Scotland ‘virtuously and valiantlye  and with great and magnanime courage’ by William Fowler, poet, courtier and former spy who enjoyed the company of heretics and was therefore attracted to the task of diffusing a text under Papal ban. Alessandra Petrina (University of Padova), author of Machiavelli in the British Isles (Ashgate, 2009) will give a talk under that title, co-sponsored by the Museo Italiano and the Faculty of Arts of the University of Melbourne, at the Museo Italiano, 189 Faraday Street, Carlton, on Thursday, 22 September 2016 from 10:00 – 11.3oam. The talk will focus on Anglo-Italian relations in early modern Europe and the reception of a book that was often used as a tool to learn the Italian language. Professor Petrina will complement it with a session from 12:00 – 1:30pm providing a contemporary view on the teaching of English in primary and secondary schools in Italy.

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Poetry by Simon West: Museo Italiano, 19 August 2015

image008Simon West’s The Ladder, his third collection of poetry and first in four years, will be launched by Lisa Gorton at the Museo Italiano, 199, Faraday St, Carlton, Wed 19 Aug, 6.30pm. Many earlier preoccupations return – the natural environment, Italian art, the dimensions of place. There is a new focus on worldly and artistic responsibility, and a fascination with the ‘certain poise’ of ‘being in between’. At the collection’s heart are the building blocks of language, along with the more literal ones of Rome, where some of these poems were written during a residency at the Whiting Studio in 2012.

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Why is that Saint holding a bbq grill?

santoDiana Hiller will address that unusual query in her talk, ‘Why is that Saint holding a barbecue grill? Cracking visual codes in Italian Renaissance painting‘, at the Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton 3053 on Thursday 11 June at 6.30pm (free event but call (03) 9349 9021 or RSVP here). People living in Italy in the early modern period had many advantages over modern viewers when looking at the paintings that surrounded them as they went about their daily lives. They saw paintings in their parish churches, in magnificent cathedrals, in municipal buildings, in hospitals, and in the local meeting places of confraternities. Merchants and well-to-do citizens had paintings in both their public and private domestic spaces. Today the most obvious visual images that we encounter in our environment are likely to be advertisements. For us paintings are generally confined to art galleries. We not only lack the all-important contexts for painted works, but we are also no longer aware of the many visual cues that were familiar to people in the Renaissance. The citizens of Florence, Siena, Venice, Milan and so on knew their Biblical stories and were generally familiar with the most important myths and gods of classical antiquity.

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Life in Bonegilla, 1947-1971

image003The Bonegilla Migrant Reception and Training Centre was the first and largest of 23 such centres in Australia. Originally an army camp, it was converted to accommodate and educate migrants and help them to find work. Between 1947 and 1971 many of the 350,000 Italian migrants (42,000 of them under the Assisted Passage Scheme) and several thousand refugees from the areas annexed by Yugoslavia after 1945 passed through Bonegilla. This exhibition of photographs, Braving Bonegilla, 4-14 June 2015 at the Museo Italiano, Carlton, documents the daily life of Italians in the camp: families striving to make their huts home under Spartan conditions, men studying English, groups of friends playing music and enjoying outings, as well as photographs taken during the so-called Bonegilla riots in 1952, and pictures of a wedding and a funeral. The opening event on 3 June at 6.30pm (RSVP here or call (03) 9349 9021) will include men and women who lived through Bonegilla.

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The ‘Problem’ of Migrant Health in Post-War Australia

Eureka copyOn 25 March, 6.30pm at the Museo Italiano (199 Faraday Street, Carlton 3053), Dr Eureka Henrich (University of Leicester) will give a talk on The ‘Problem’ of Migrant Health in Post-War Australia.

In the quarter-century following the Second World War Australia embarked upon an unprecedented immigration programme which encouraged 2.5 million people to move to the other side of the world. Assisted passage agreements were brokered with Britain, the Netherlands, Italy, West Germany, Austria, Greece, Turkey and Yugoslavia, as well as with the International Refugee Organisation, the latter facilitating the journeys of more than 170,000 refugees from Central and Eastern Europe. These migrants were intended to increase national security by bolstering the Australian population, and to provide the essential labour for an expanding economy. The Department of Information, together with the Department of Immigration orchestrated a publicity campaign to allay domestic concerns about the arrival of so many ‘Poms’ and ‘foreigners’. They emphasised the health and assimilability of these ‘New Australians’, portraying robust and friendly young workers keen to shake off their pasts and become fellow citizens. To attract migrants, an image of Australia as a ‘healthy haven’ was cultivated, with an emphasis on quality of life and an abundance of opportunities.

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