Tag Archives: migration

Recent Italian migration to Australia

Much has been written about Italian migration to Australia in the 1950s and 1960s but little is known about the new, young, skilled and educated Italian migrants of today. A new study, Australia’s New Wave of Italian Migration: Paradise or Illusion? (Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2017), edited by Bruno Mascitelli & Riccardo Armillei, will be launched by Joe Lo Bianco (University of Melbourne) at CO.AS.IT., 199 Faraday Street, Carlton on Thursday 5 Oct 2017 at 6.30pm (free event: RSVP here). The book tackles many aspects of Italian migration, short-term and long-term, to Australia over the past twenty years, enabling us – thanks to the wide range of expertise among the contributors – to deepen our understanding of the scope and meaning of its multiple facets.      Continue reading

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Diaspore italiane – Italy in Movement

The international three-conference project, Diaspore italiane: Italy in Movement, begins with its inaugural event, Living Transcultural Space, in Melbourne on 5-7 April 2018: the call for papers is now open. The other two conferences will be Transnationalism and Questions of Identity in New York (1-3 November 2018) and Between Immigration and Historical Amnesia in Genoa (27-29 June 2019).  Full details of the project can be found on its website. The Melbourne conference, taking place in a multicultural city with a large Italian community now entering the third generation, will explore the notion of transcultural living as a practice and an ideal. Transcultural contexts show cultural identities in motion as they develop in reciprocal contact, emerging as historical constructs carried forward by transcultural subjects. Two of the key themes addressed at the conference will therefore be how ideas of identities in motion compare with traditional ways of understanding cultural identities as fixed essences, typically anchored to notions of blood, land or divinity, and whether migration, diaspora and colonial studies are paradigmatic of emancipatory discourses and practices for the 21st century.

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The Greeks in Venice, 1498‒1600

The Hellenic Museum and Co.As.It. Museo Italiano will launch The Greeks of Venice, 1498‒1600: Immigration, Settlement, and Integration by Ersie C. Burke with a presentation by Carolyn James (Monash University) on Thursday 10 August 2017 at 6.30pm, Co.As.It. Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton (free event; RSVP here). Burke traces the history of Venice’s Greek population during the formative years between 1498 and 1600 when thousands left their homelands for Venice. She describes how Greeks established new communal and social networks, making the transition from outsiders to insiders (though not quite Venetians) in the context of multi-cultural, multi-ethnic, and multi-lingual Venice. This reconstruction of the history of the largest Christian ethnic minority in early modern Venice is interwoven with individual stories drawn from a great variety of sources – notarial documents, petitions, gov­ernment and church records, registries of marriages and deaths, and census data – held in Vene­tian church and state archives and in the Hellenic Institute of Venice.

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Oltre i confini: Italia transnazionale

BEYOND BORDERS. Transnational Italy/OLTRE I CONFINI. Italia Transnazionale, an exhibition curated by Viviana Gravano and Giulia Grechi, will open at the Co.As.It Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Melbourne, on Thursday 4 May 2017 at 6.30pm (free, registration here). It will be introduced by Loredana Polezzi (Cardiff University) and Rita Wilson (Monash University), with a performance by Luci Callipari-Marcuzzo. The exhibition is part of TML – Transnationalizing Modern Languages. Mobility, Identity and Translation in Modern Italian Cultures, a major international research project which includes collaborations with the Istituto Italiano di Cultura (London), J. Calandra Institute in New York, Co.As.It Melbourne and other partners. The project looks at the Italian communities established in the UK, the US, Australia, South America, Africa and at the migrant communities of contemporary Italy. After Rome, London and New York, the adapted version of the exhibition will be open at the Museo Italiano from 4-27 May, accompanied by a photographic project, Italy is Out, by Mario Badagliacca who has worked as artist in residence for the project in London, New York and Buenos Aires.

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Migration to Australia: recent arrivals from Italy

Riccardo Armillei (Deakin) & Bruno Mascitelli (Swinburne)

300px-Australian_Census_2011_demographic_map_-_Australia_by_SLA_-_BCP_field_1126_Italian_Total_Responses.svgBetween 1945 and 1983 some 400,000 Italians, usually unskilled and with limited education, came to Australia as ‘permanent and long term arrivals’, most arriving between 1952 and 1970. Thereafter the annual intake fell steadily. However, in recent years Australia has become a destination for a new generation of migrants from Italy – this time young highly-educated Italians seeking fresh opportunities. The earlier wave has been exhaustively studied by demographers, linguists and sociologists but little is known or understood about the recent migrants. While their small numbers hardly indicate a new ‘boom’ time (pace Dalla Bernadina, Grigoletti & Pianelli, 2013; Grigoletti & Pianelli, 2014, Marchese, 2014), their experiences are nonetheless worthy of investigation. To this end, we used surveys and focus groups to examine the temporary and permanent migration from Italy to Australia over the period between 2004, when the so-called Working Holiday Arrangement between the two states was agreed, and 2016 (Armillei & Mascitelli, 2016).   Continue reading

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Objects in Italian life and culture

9781349948741In 2014 Paolo Bartoloni (NUI, Galway) gave a series of lectures in Australia on material culture and objects in the context of migration, multiculturalism, and transnational culture. The book containing some of the work he presented is about to be published as Objects in Italian Life and Culture: Fiction, Migration, and Artificiality (Palgrave Macmillan). Two of the five chapters focus on Australia. The chapter on migration is based on the exhibition Belongings: Post-WW2 Migration Memories and Journeys at the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sydney, and the chapter ‘Multicultural and Transcultural Objects’ is a discussion of the Italian Forum in Sydney. The other three chapters provide a discussion of theoretical perspectives on material culture (“Meaningful Places”), objects in literature and cinema (“Fictional Objects”), and the adaptation of tradition and authenticity in contemporary culture (“Objects as Props”).

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Italian Cinema: special issue of FULGOR

7fbb78_783f57d50c2240d4b0f23be547a41fbeA special issue on Italian cinema (vol. 5, issue 1, April 2016) has just been published by FULGOR, the Flinders University Languages Group Online Review. The issue, guest-edited by Luciana d’Arcangeli with support from Laura Lori and Stefano Bona, covers a wide range of topics: trends in contemporary Italian cinema (Vito Zagarrio), including the treatment of gender and socio-sexual identity (Luciana d’Arcangeli); the presence of Italians in the early history of the Australian film industry (Gino Moliterno); a comparison of the texts and sub-texts of the films made by Italian directors in China between 1957 and 2012 (Stefano Bona); an analysis of the encounters between migrant Italians and indigenous Australians in Diego Cienetiempo’s Far Away is Home. La Storia di Clely (2012) (Matteo Dutto); and an interpretation of Costanza Quatriglio’s film of Vincenzo Rabito’s autobiography Terra matta (David Moss). FULGOR is a peer-reviewed journal affiliated with the Department of Languages and Applied Linguistics, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia. Back issues can be found here.

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Documentary Film and Migration in Twentieth-century Italy – CfP

20477368The Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies is calling for proposals of contributions to a special issue, Documentary Film and Migration in Twentieth-century Italy, guest-edited by Gaoheng Zhang (Department of Italian Studies, University of Toronto). Long before the 2015 refugee and migrant crisis captured international attention, Italy was at the forefront of the European management of post-Cold War mass immigration from around the globe. Only thirty years earlier the country was itself undergoing a large-scale internal migration from the South to the North, and from countryside to city. Still earlier, between the late 19th and mid-20th centuries,  Italians had emigrated to the Americas, Northern Europe, Australia, and elsewhere, constituting one of the most significant labor diasporas in modern history. These events have been decisive for Italy as a nation, a people and a cultural entity. How did the only new major art form developed in the twentieth century—the cinema—represent and influence these migrations? In particular, how did documentary cinema—arguably contemporary Italy’s most versatile and prolific film genre—respond to and reflect on the migratory flows?

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‘A different telling’: voice, dream, theatre

Whyte_MUSEOYou are cordially invited to a reading from A Different Telling, a one-act play by Leisa Whyte, with local actors Sebastian Bertoli and Georgia Whyte, live music by Alison Davey, at Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton on Tuesday 1 September, 6.30pm (free event but booking essential). About the play: as we grow older, many of us have a desire to know more about our heritage: it helps us define who we are and to make sense of the way we interact with others. Mia, a young university student is deliberating how to tackle her latest assignment on identity. Thinking and questioning out loud, she realises that the voice answering from behind the local bar where she is ‘studying’ is actually that of her great-great-grandfather, Giacomo Rossi, a 19th century Italian immigrant. Initially thinking she must be dreaming, Mia plays along with her imagination, only to find the ‘voice’ is starting to reveal a story she has never known about her ancestors and their journey to a new life in Australia. As the play develops, Giacomo becomes so real to Mia she can almost reach out and touch him: she feels his pain as he talks of the tragedies that befell his family and their resilience despite it all. She is beginning to piece together her story, character by character: to understand more fully her own identity. Or has it, in fact, been just a dream… Continue reading

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Life in Bonegilla, 1947-1971

image003The Bonegilla Migrant Reception and Training Centre was the first and largest of 23 such centres in Australia. Originally an army camp, it was converted to accommodate and educate migrants and help them to find work. Between 1947 and 1971 many of the 350,000 Italian migrants (42,000 of them under the Assisted Passage Scheme) and several thousand refugees from the areas annexed by Yugoslavia after 1945 passed through Bonegilla. This exhibition of photographs, Braving Bonegilla, 4-14 June 2015 at the Museo Italiano, Carlton, documents the daily life of Italians in the camp: families striving to make their huts home under Spartan conditions, men studying English, groups of friends playing music and enjoying outings, as well as photographs taken during the so-called Bonegilla riots in 1952, and pictures of a wedding and a funeral. The opening event on 3 June at 6.30pm (RSVP here or call (03) 9349 9021) will include men and women who lived through Bonegilla.

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