Tag Archives: literary translation

Le XI Giornate della traduzione letteraria, Urbino

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

I was lucky enough this month to attend the XI Giornate della traduzione letteraria in Urbino. This is an annual event dedicated to the practice and profession of literary translation, organized by Stefano Arduini and Ilide Carmignani. Continue reading

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The global circulation of crime fiction: The case of Gianluca Carofiglio

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

Gianrico Carofiglio

Gianrico Carofiglio

Crime fiction – what it is or is not, who reads it, how it circulates – was the focus of a conference hosted earlier this month by Leeds University and the Crime Studies Network. Papers, keynote addresses and panel discussions explored the theme “Retold, Resold, Transformed: Crime Fiction in the Modern Era”.

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Scerbanenco, new translation welcome

Barbara Pezzotti   ACIS

I was very pleased to know that a new translation into English of Giorgio Scerbanenco’s “Traditori di tutti” (1966) has finally appeared this year. Published under the title of “Betrayal” by Hersilia Press, this new translation by Howard Curtis finally does justice to Scerbanenco’s distinctive style and (after more than forty years) re-introduces  a masterpiece of Italian crime fiction to an English-speaking audience. When they first appeared in the 1960s, the adventures of Duca Lamberti, a former doctor struck off the register and imprisoned for practising euthanasia, captured first the attention and then the devotion of a large number of crime fiction readers in Italy.

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Diego Marani on language addiction

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

Last week Diego Marani, novelist, translator and inventor of Europanto, spoke to a capacity audience at the Italian Cultural Institute in Melbourne about how he got hooked on languages.

Diego Marani in Melbourne

Diego Marani in Melbourne

In a conversation about language, identity and what it means to be European, he discussed the way his writing explores the question of multilingualism, an important issue in an expanding and globalized Europe. Diego Marani has dedicated much of his life to studying languages, both for professional purposes – he worked as a translator and interpreter for the European Commission, where he is now multilingual policy officer – and per diletto. Once he started learning languages, he couldn’t stop. The rush he felt upon being able to adopt a new identity along with the unfamiliar sounds, structures and meanings of a new language soon became something he couldn’t do without.

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Translating globalized popular culture

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

Translating cultural references can be very tricky, but some cultural references have an international reach, and the internet is making the translator’s – and perhaps also the reader’s – work easier, though also a little fragmented at times. I wrote recently about some difficulties that came up when translating snippets from Drive In, an Italian commercial television show of the mid-1980s that, according to Nicola Lagioia in Riportando tutto a casa, marked a decisive (and lamentable) change in the country’s television culture. As I work my way through the translation of this novel, set in Bari in the eighties, more and more references to popular culture are appearing. Many are far less culture-specific than Drive In though, belonging instead to a kind of shared youth culture of the West.

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