Tag Archives: literary translation

Conferenza d’italianistica 2014

Barbara Pezzotti    ACIS

Daniela Cavallaro (Università di Auckland) segnala un interessante convegno di italianistica, intitolato “ITALIANISTICA 2.0” che si terrà a Banja Luka (Bosnia ed Erzegovina) il  5-7 giugno 2014. Ecco il link e alcune informazioni al riguardo.

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Le XI Giornate della traduzione letteraria, Urbino

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

I was lucky enough this month to attend the XI Giornate della traduzione letteraria in Urbino. This is an annual event dedicated to the practice and profession of literary translation, organized by Stefano Arduini and Ilide Carmignani. Continue reading

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The global circulation of crime fiction: The case of Gianluca Carofiglio

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

Gianrico Carofiglio

Gianrico Carofiglio

Crime fiction – what it is or is not, who reads it, how it circulates – was the focus of a conference hosted earlier this month by Leeds University and the Crime Studies Network. Papers, keynote addresses and panel discussions explored the theme “Retold, Resold, Transformed: Crime Fiction in the Modern Era”.

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Scerbanenco, new translation welcome

Barbara Pezzotti   ACIS

I was very pleased to know that a new translation into English of Giorgio Scerbanenco’s “Traditori di tutti” (1966) has finally appeared this year. Published under the title of “Betrayal” by Hersilia Press, this new translation by Howard Curtis finally does justice to Scerbanenco’s distinctive style and (after more than forty years) re-introduces  a masterpiece of Italian crime fiction to an English-speaking audience. When they first appeared in the 1960s, the adventures of Duca Lamberti, a former doctor struck off the register and imprisoned for practising euthanasia, captured first the attention and then the devotion of a large number of crime fiction readers in Italy.

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Diego Marani on language addiction

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

Last week Diego Marani, novelist, translator and inventor of Europanto, spoke to a capacity audience at the Italian Cultural Institute in Melbourne about how he got hooked on languages.

Diego Marani in Melbourne

Diego Marani in Melbourne

In a conversation about language, identity and what it means to be European, he discussed the way his writing explores the question of multilingualism, an important issue in an expanding and globalized Europe. Diego Marani has dedicated much of his life to studying languages, both for professional purposes – he worked as a translator and interpreter for the European Commission, where he is now multilingual policy officer – and per diletto. Once he started learning languages, he couldn’t stop. The rush he felt upon being able to adopt a new identity along with the unfamiliar sounds, structures and meanings of a new language soon became something he couldn’t do without.

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Murder and Mayhem in Translation

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MURDER AND MAYHEM IN TRANSLATION

Literary Translation Winter School: French, Italian and Spanish

Monash University Caulfield Campus, Melbourne, Australia

June 27, 28, 29 and July 1 2013

This year’s exciting event merges the theme of crime fiction with translation. We are very excited to confirm the following authors and translators: 

French Stream: Author DOMINQUE SYLVAIN and translator JEAN ANDERSON

Italian Stream: Author CARLO LUCARELLI and translator BRIGID MAHER

Spanish Stream: Author LORENZO SILVA and translator IMOGEN WILLIAMS

In partnership with the British Centre for Literary Translation, Monash University’s Translation and Interpreting Studies program is running its annual literary translation winter school aimed at students, writers, professional translators, language teachers and anyone interested in literary translation!

The school consists of a week-long residential program of hands-on translation practice accompanied by public talks and panel discussions addressing a wide range of topics, as well as networking opportunities.

Daily translation workshops are led by both an expert translator and the author of the text to be translated.

For more info on registration, rates, location and accommodation, click here.

Further enquiries: Leah.Gerber@monash.edu

 

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Diego Marani in Melbourne: 28 May 2013

The Australian Association for Literary Translation (AALITRA), the Italian Cultural Institute Melbourne, and Text Publishing are sponsoring a talk (in English) by Diego Marani, author of New Finnish Grammar and The Last of the Vostyachs on Tuesday 28 May at 6pm at the Italian Cultural Institute, 233 Domain Road, South Yarra.  Diego Marani was born in Ferrara in 1959. He has worked as a translator and policy officer for the European Union and has written several novels, collections of essays, and short stories. Every week he writes a column for a Swiss newspaper about current affairs in Europanto, a language he invented. New Finnish Grammar was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Award and the Best Translated Book Award. Judith Landry won the 2012 Oxford-Weidenfeld Translation Prize for her translation of New Finnish Grammar.

Admission is free; refreshments will be served. Bookings are essential. Email bookings.iicmelbourne@esteri.it or phone 9866 5931.

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DisLocated Readings: Translation and Transnationalism

ASAL mini-conference, 21-22 February, 2013 – Monash University Caulfield Campus

Translation & Interpreting Studies and the National Centre for Australian Studies

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The transnational reception of Australian literature within global literary markets and and readerships suggests that national frameworks are being superseded and mediated by an increasingly ‘transnational’ imaginary.
This ASAL mini-conference seeks to map the wider coordinates of the transnational currents of Australian literature. Contemporary literary scholarship is interested in how the effects of globalization might shape Australian literature in its broadest definition: including travel writing, life-writing, migrant, refugee and Indigenous fiction, as well as writing and translations in languages other than English.
This 1.5 day symposium will explore the effects of translation (in both inter- and intralingual forms) on our textual relationships with the region and the world.
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Translating globalized popular culture

Brigid Maher   La Trobe University

Translating cultural references can be very tricky, but some cultural references have an international reach, and the internet is making the translator’s – and perhaps also the reader’s – work easier, though also a little fragmented at times. I wrote recently about some difficulties that came up when translating snippets from Drive In, an Italian commercial television show of the mid-1980s that, according to Nicola Lagioia in Riportando tutto a casa, marked a decisive (and lamentable) change in the country’s television culture. As I work my way through the translation of this novel, set in Bari in the eighties, more and more references to popular culture are appearing. Many are far less culture-specific than Drive In though, belonging instead to a kind of shared youth culture of the West.

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