Tag Archives: IHS

Sapori della memoria

IMG_2717On Wednesday 25 November at 6.30 pm, co-authors Mariella Totaro-Genevois and Nicoletta Zanardi, in conversation with food writer Tania Cammarano, will be introducing their new book, Sapori della memoria/Of Food and Memories (Martogezan, 2014) at the Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton (free but booking essential). The book, also co-authored by Paola Marmini, is a collection of Italian recipes and related stories, written in Italian by Italians who live or have lived in Australia. The stories place the recipes in their contexts of time, space and emotions, demonstrating the reasons for their survival in the lives in Australia of the eighty or so contributors. The recipes and stories come from a wide variety of backgrounds and are published both in Italian and in English translation by Barbara McGilvray.

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La Voce Della Luna

La Voce Della Lunaluna_yarra_cd_cover is a Melbourne-based multi-generational Italian women’s choir which has been singing Italian folk songs since 1996. In Songs of Motherland, at the Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday St, Carlton on Thursday 19 November at 6.30pm (free but booking essential), with their musical director since July 2013, Elvira Andreoli, they will be presenting their third CD, a collection of songs from Italy from the 16th century onwards and from Australia, realised with the collaboration of indigenous singer-songwriter Joe Geia, the Neapolitan singer Annamaria Colasanto, multi-instrumentalist Phil Carroll and hurdy-gurdy aficionado Alexander Parise. The choir’s repertoire speaks of love, loss, war, poverty, pain, turmoil, rebellion and injustice, celebrations, harvest, the seasons, joy, of ‘times gone by long ago’, as well as the ever-present ‘nostalgia’ of the migrant experience.

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Italian Australian: Creating Culture, Defining Diaspora

image005An exhibition, Italian Australian: Creating Culture, Defining Diaspora, will open at the Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton, on Wednesday 26 August at 6.30pm with a talk by Professor Ghassan Hage from the University of Melbourne (booking required). The exhibition will run from 27 August to 16 October 2015 (free entry; opening hours: Tuesday – Friday 10-5; Saturday 12.30-5). Wogs, Dagos, Post-War migrants, New Australians, Zips, Marios and Marias, I-Ties, Multicultural Australia. All these phrases have been used to categorise and describe the Italian diaspora in Australia. This exhibition addresses these labels, some embraced, some forgotten, some derogatory, by asking the question: Can we define ourselves? Is it possible to document the commonalities of experience and of culture and to start to trace the transition from migrant group to diaspora? Documentary and street photography by Melbourne photographer, Gracie Lolicato along with the portraits and recorded interviews of around 200 volunteers result in an exhibition that may confirm but also challenge your impressions of Italian-Australians. This is not a nostalgic gaze into tradition, nor is it a definitive contemporary docu­ment, but rather an introduction to the idea that it is possible to be both Australian and Italian and to feel like you are neither.

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Of lobsters, guinea pigs, treachery and charity

image003Leonardo da Vinci’s fresco of Christ’s Last Supper is among the most immediately recognis­able paintings in the world. Versions are found on T-shirts, biscuit tins, coffee mugs and cushions. Leonardo’s painting, however, was created from within a long tradition of such works. This talk by Diana Hiller, entitled Of lobsters, guinea pigs, treachery and charity: changing Last Supper iconography, at the Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton on Tuesday 11 August 2015 at 6.30pm, focuses on the iconography of Last Supper images from early secret versions on the walls of Roman catacombs to the large canvases of Tintoretto in some of the grand­est churches in Venice. From the mid-fourteenth century in Tuscany – and above all in Florence – the custom of decorating the end wall of a convent refectory with a Last Supper fresco became so popular that it was unusual for a refectory not to have one. The specific iconography altered with changing contexts; and variations in the works depended on such disparate features as the lo­cal foods available, the wealth of the convent, the ori­gin of the commissioning, where the works were placed and, in some instances, even the gender of the viewers.

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