Tag Archives: gardens

Italian Gardens in the Renaissance

260px-Bomarzo_MonsterThe University of Melbourne is hosting an evening symposium, “The Renaissance of Gardens”, dedicated to Italian gardens in the Renaissance on Friday, 26 June 2015 from 6.00 – 7.30pm in the Macmahon Ball Theatre, Ground Floor, Old Arts Building. The speakers and their topics will be: Richard Aitken, architect, historian and curator: The Italian Renaissance garden in Australia: Ideas and EchoesKatherine Bentz, Art History, Saint Anselm College: Exercise for Sound Body and Mind: The Culture of Walking in Italian Renaissance Gardens: and Luke Morgan, Art History & Theory, Monash University: The Monster in the Garden. The programme will be introduced by Andrea Rizzi, ARC Future Fellow, Melbourne University. For details on the speakers and their publications, click here. The event is free but requires booking here.

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Jo-Anne Duggan Essay Prize 2015

Jo-Anne Duggan Essay Prize PosterWe are delighted to announce the outcome of the inaugural Jo-Anne Duggan Essay Prize sponsored by ACIS. The winner is Sally Grant, ECR (PhD, University of Sydney, 2013) for her essay on ‘The Eighteenth-Century Experience of the Veneto Country House: Andrea Urbani’s Decoration of Villa Vendramin Calergi’s Room of the Gardens’. Two entrants were highly commended: Crystal Filep (PhD candidate, University of Otago) for her creative work and exegesis ‘Intersection Unbounded’ and Kyra Giorgi, ECR (PhD, La Trobe University, 2013) for her essay ‘La speranza: Spaces of hoping, waiting and dreaming in Italian migration’.  The Panel for the Prize has provided the following summaries of the three entries …. Continue reading

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William Kent: Designing Georgian Britain (under Italian influence)

Sally Grant   New York

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Chiswick House with statue of Palladio © Devonshire Collection, Chatsworth

Anyone heading to London in the next couple of months or so may want to check out the current exhibition being held at the V&A, William Kent: Designing Georgian Britain. While the title itself doesn’t convey any obvious Italian links, like so many others who made the Grand Tour during the eighteenth century, Kent was very much influenced by the art and culture of Italy. This is especially thought-provoking here as the organisers present Kent, who was a painter, designer, and architect, as integral to the development of a style of art that reflected the ideals of a new, Georgian, British nation. (The exhibition is one of a number of events this year that celebrate the 300th year anniversary of the Hanoverian accession to the throne in 1714.)

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Los Angeles: Gardens at the Getty

Pippa Salonius   CMRS  UCLA

The incredible thing about the Getty is its ability to consistently produce new and exciting temporary shows of outstanding quality every two or three months. I just got back from an excellent exhibition at the Getty Museum on ‘Gardens in the Renaissance‘, May 28 – August 11, 2013.

Jean Bourdichon, 'Bathsheba Bathing', Leaf from the Hours of Louis XII, Tours. 1498-1499. Los Angeles, Getty Institute, Ms. 79r.

Jean Bourdichon, ‘Bathsheba Bathing’, Leaf from the Hours of Louis XII, Tours. 1498-1499. Los Angeles, Getty Institute, Ms. 79r.

Predominantly a display of Renaissance gardens in illuminated manuscripts, I really appreciated the variety of media curator Bryan Keene introduced his audience to. The map of the garden belonging to a private Nuremburg residence, oil paintings, prints of Florentine pageantry and the use of digital media all brought the show to life in a thoroughly enjoyable polished interactive performance. What fun! Plants are briefly described for their medical properties, their religious symbolism, and historical context, and the show ends with Hoefnagel’s exquisite botanical drawings in a very fine manuscript of calligraphy made for the Holy Roman emperors Ferdinand I and Rudolph II. Although this introduction to Renaissance gardens examines the European context in general, fabulous illustrations from Giovanni Boccaccio’s Concerning the Fates of Illustrious Men and Women and Francesco Colonna’s early printed book on Poliphilo among other specific Italian examples should certainly satiate any ACIS readers.

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