Tag Archives: di Lampedusa

The Leopard at 60

The 60th anniversary of the publication of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa’s The Leopard will be celebrated at the University of Melbourne on 12-14 November 2018. On 12 November the writer Simonetta Agnello-Hornby will give an open public lecture, The North and South in 20th Century Italy and the Effect of ‘The Leopard’ in Sicily and in Europe, examining the impact of di Lampedusa’s major work, in book and film (Visconti, 1963) form, in Sicily itself and on European views of Sicilians. The lecture, 5.30-6.30pm in the Forum Theatre (North Wing), Arts West Building (153), at the University of Melbourne, is the prelude to a 2-day symposium, Sicily, Italy and the Supranational Cultural Imaginary, convened by Mark Nicholls (Melbourne), Gregoria Manzin (La Trobe), Annamaria Pagliaro (Monash) and Agnese Bresin (Melbourne and La Trobe) on 13-14 November, 10.00am-5.00pm at the Interactive Cinema, Arts West 353, at the University of Melbourne. The symposium, open to all, will cover many aspects of di Lampedusa’s work, along with analyses of Visconti’s film  and a variety of Sicilian texts, art works and historical events. Registration for the lecture is here. For further information on the lecture and the symposium, contact Mark Nicholls.   Continue reading

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‘Gabriele D’Annunzio never met an adverb he didn’t like’

TLS_Beard_396117kThat’s the opening sentence of a review by Joseph Luzzi of a recent translation of D’Annunzio’s Pleasure in this week’s Times Literary Supplement (3 Jan 2014). Apart from this review which chimes in with the recent post on D’Annunzio by Stefano Bragato, the issue has other pieces of interest to Italianists. Focusing on the relation between art and power, Mary Beard compares the celebrations of the 2000th anniversary of the birth (63 BC) of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus, by Mussolini in 1937 (the Mostra Augustea della Romanità) with the current exhibition in Rome to celebrate the 2000th anniversary of his death (14 AD), more soberly entitled Augusto. Then Joe Farrell reviews a translation of The Childhood Memories and Other Stories by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa (the author said that no one would ever read those memories, sharing the misplaced confidence of many writers that their juvenilia, private correspondence and laundry lists will never be made public). And, for comparative literature specialists, there is also an extended review of Franco Moretti’s two recent books, Distant Reading and The Bourgeois.

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