Tag Archives: crime fiction

Place and culture in Italian crime fiction: AJCF special issue

Italian-Crime-Fiction-468x252The Australian Journal of Crime Fiction has just published a special issue, ‘Place and Culture in Italian Crime Fiction‘, edited by Barbara Pezzotti and Brigid Maher and available free online (vol.2, no.1, 2016).  The editors discuss the ways that authors have used crime fiction to depict, criticise or endorse features of local and national society; they also note the shifting meaning of ‘impegno’ and its historically controversial application to the genre. Andrea Camilleri is the central figure in several contributions: Emilio Lomonaco examines the relation of his style to traditions of Sicilian story-telling; Giuliana Pieri interviews him on the nature of European and his own crime fiction; and Alistair Rolls explores issues of translatability through the English version of La forma dell’acqua (1994). Margie Michael identifies the sense of placelessness that characterises works by Roberto Costantini and the New Zealand author Paul Cleave; and Piera Carroli unravels the multicultural complexities of Marilù Oliva’s trilogy set in Bologna: Tù la pagaras!, Fuego and Mala suerte (2010-12). Finally, capturing in her title the protagonist’s equal interest in toxicology and designer handbags, Brigid Maher offers a translation of the first two chapters of Alessia Gazzola’s L’allieva (2012).

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Why Crime Fiction Matters: Melbourne workshop 21 November

Crime-SceneThe final programme and abstracts (open to all) and draft papers (restricted to paper-givers) are available from the Conferences menu above. This is also a reminder to anyone who is not presenting a paper but wants to attend to let Brigid Maher know as soon as possible for catering purposes.

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Writing and Translating Crime Fiction during Italian Fascism

Caterina Sinibaldi   University of Manchester

Donna LeonOver the last twenty years, Italian crime fiction has attracted growing scholarly attention, both in Italy and in the Anglophone world. If, on the one hand, this is due to a renewed interest in previously neglected areas of ‘letteratura popolare’, on the other it cannot be denied that Italy itself has become a central theme in crime fiction. Not only have contemporary Italian authors, such as Carlo Lucarelli and Andrea Camilleri, gained international success, but also British and North-American authors (Michael Dibdin and Donna Leon, just to mention two) have chosen to set their detective stories in Italy.

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Reminder: Crime Fiction Workshop, Melbourne, 21 November 2014

Crime-SceneJust a reminder for anyone wanting to present a paper at the ACIS-La Trobe workshop on Italian crime fiction in Melbourne on 21 November 2014 that abstracts are due by 15 July. The Call for Papers with all the information on submissions is here: all the details of location and time are there too. We’d also be very grateful if anyone intending to come but not to present a paper could let the organisers know, for space and catering reasons.

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Crime fiction, society, history

978-0-7864-7652-7Crime fiction has become an increasingly popular instrument for analysing whatever social and cultural order there once was and now is. Contributions to the genre are investigated, using some of the same techniques deployed by their protagonists, for the street-life materials and perspectives which many sociological analyses leave out. Shifts in the nature of the crimes and the character of criminals and their pursuers, hapless, heroic or just plain human, are scrutinised for the light they can shed on long-term political and cultural changes. The evolution of Italian crime fiction has recently been tracked in detail by Barbara Pezzotti in her Politics and Society in Italian Crime Fiction: An Historical Overview (2014), which takes the reader from Mondadori’s launch of i libri gialli in 1929 up to the work of Marcello Fois and his use of the genre to probe Sardinian identity.

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Workshop on crime fiction: Melbourne, 21 Nov 2014

Crime-Scene

A one-day workshop on researching and teaching Italian crime fiction, sponsored by ACIS and La Trobe University and convened by Barbara Pezzotti (ACIS) and Brigid Maher (La Trobe), will be held on Friday 21 November 2014 at the La Trobe University City Campus, 215 Franklin St, Melbourne CBD, from 9 am to 5 pm. Stephen Knight (Melbourne) will give the opening address; postgraduates working on crime fiction will be especially welcome. Click here for the call for papers. Participation is free and lunch/tea/coffee will also be provided. We will update the information on the workshop page on the Conferences menu above, where you will also find a contact form for any questions or further details.

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Crime Fiction Conferences in 2014/2

Barbara Pezzotti    ACIS

cropped-wordpress_cover_2014_1Dear crime fiction lovers, here two more conferences that will take place in 2014: “True Crime. Facts, Fiction, Ideology” Conference, Manchester, 6-7 June 2014; and “Crime Fiction: Here and There and Again”,  2nd International Postgraduate Conference, University of Gdańsk (Poland) and the State School of Higher Professional Education in Elbląg, 11-13 September 2014. The deadline for presenting an abstract for both conferences is 31 March.They both look very interesting. Continue reading

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Crime Fiction Conferences in 2014/1

Barbara Pezzotti   ACIS

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The year 2014 has been blessed with quite a few crime fiction conferences. Here are the first two, whose deadlines for sending an abstract are 6 January and 1 February respectively: “Captivating Criminality. Crime Fiction, Darkness and Desire” Conference, Bath Spa University and Crime Studies Network (24-26 April 2014); and “Evil Incarnate: Manifestations of Villains and Villainy“, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (11-13 July).

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Disfunctional Female Detectives: the Exception or the Norm?

Barbara Pezzotti   ACIS

I have recently been watching the Danish/Swedish TV series “The Bridge” which, like many other hundreds of thousands of people in the world, I am enjoying very much. However, I can’t help but being a little annoyed by the female protagonist, who, like many other fictional female detectives nowadays, is disfunctional. Actually, in “The Bridge” case, very, very disfunctional. The Swedish detective Saga, who shows an extreme lack of empathy towards colleagues, witnesses, victims and whoever is involved in her investigations and life, is in good company.

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