Tag Archives: archives

The Visible and the Invisible in Italian Culture

Vuw-logoThe History and Italian Programmes at Victoria University of Wellington invite papers for a two-day workshop, ‘The Visible and Invisible in Italian Culture, to be held on 8-9 July 2016.  John Foot (University of Bristol) will be the keynote speaker. The meeting aims to investigate how Italy has dealt with the ambiguities, anomalies and contradictions of its social and political life since Unification, and with how it has engaged, or failed to engage, the people at its margins. The organisers, Sally Hill and Giacomo Lichtner, welcome papers and/or panel submissions from a variety of disciplines and viewpoints, including comparative and transnational perspectives.

Continue reading

Tagged , , ,

Thematic Portals: Italy’s state archives

rmis20.v018.i02.coverCan we distinguish libraries from archives? hooks for fishing from compasses for orientation? ICAR from SAN? A contribution to the latest issue (2015, 5: 732-739) of the Journal of Modern Italian Studies by Mauro Tosti Croce & Maria Natalina Trivisan, ‘Thematic Portals: Tools for Research and Making the Archival Heritage Known‘, guides us through these distinctions and the ways to access digitalised resources from Italy’s state archives. It lists, with information and web addresses, nine thematic portals covering acts of violence, company archives, fashion, music, architecture, the records of former psychiatric hospitals, ancestors, cartographies and property records, and the music of Verdi.

Tagged

Quaderno poetico #6: Going behind the scenes (II) – Archives

Theodore Ell   University of Sydney

220px-Stipula_fountain_penThis is the first of two posts about working in archives, where so many of us spend so much our time, in Italy and elsewhere. My work concentrates on the Florentine poet Piero Bigongiari and I will have more to say about working on his archival materials later, as well as talking about the technical questions involved – transcribing handwriting, handling old paper and so on. First, though, I have found myself reflecting on archival work in general, the fascination, frustrations, fun and fanaticism that surround it. I’m interested to hear other people’s archival stories and philosophies, particularly if they disagree with mine. Archival work often makes you feel that you’re the only one in the world doing what you’re doing (a chosen one, even!) but of course we’re never alone. The Renaissance scholar Gene Brucker has called himself an ‘archive junkie.’ There must be more out there. Be proud of it.

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , ,

Quaderno poetico #6: Going behind the scenes (II) – Archives

Theodore Ell   University of Sydney

220px-Stipula_fountain_pen

This is the first of two posts about working in archives, where so many of us spend so much our time, in Italy and elsewhere. My work concentrates on the Florentine poet Piero Bigongiari and I will have more to say about working on his archival materials later, as well as talking about the technical questions involved – transcribing handwriting, handling old paper and  so on. First, though, I have found myself reflecting on archival work in general, the fascination, frustrations, fun and fanaticism that surround it. I’m interested to hear other people’s archival stories and philosophies, particularly if they disagree with mine. Archival work often makes you feel that you’re the only one in the world doing what you’re doing (a chosen one, even!) but of course we’re never alone. The Renaissance scholar Gene Brucker has called himself an ‘archive junkie.’ There must be more out there. Be proud of it.  

Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , ,