Tag Archives: ACIS conferences

Indelible/Indelebile Conference in Adelaide: associated events

The VPS Research Group has organised a number of free Italian events/performances open to the public and linked to its international interdisciplinary conference Indelible (Eng) / Indelebile (It) – Representation in the arts of (in)visible violence against women and their resistance, to be held at Flinders University at Victoria Square, Adelaide, on 23-25 October 2019. The links to the various options can be found on the conference webpage under ‘Visual and Performing Arts Events’. All events are part of La Settimana della Lingua Italiana nel Mondo/The Italian Language Week in the World and there is also another free performance (in Italian): Affabulazioni. Storie, fatti e fattacci, narrati da un Giullare pazzo e una Musicista con la testa fra le nuvole (in Italian). This performance is organised by the Italian Consulate in Adelaide at UniSA at 6.30pm on 23 October. Book online here through the eventbrite website which has details of the location.

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INDELIBLE / INDELEBILE – NEW DEADLINE OF THE CALL FOR PAPERS

The new deadline for the submission of paper proposals to the international Interdisciplinary conference, INDELIBLE / INDELEBILE  – Representation in the arts of (in)visible violence against women and their resistance, supported by ACIS on 23-25 October 2019 at Flinders University in Adelaide (South Australia), is 30 March 2019 (details for submissions below). Our interdisciplinary conference aims to contribute to the ‘glocal’ conversation on the topic of gendered violence and at the same time raise awareness of the global extent of the problem by analysing ways in which both such violence and resistance to it are represented in the arts. While a key strand of the conference will concern the arts in contemporary Italy, its scope will be broad, encouraging comparison with other societies across space and time. Keynote speakers will be Dacia Maraini (accompanied by a performance of her Passi affrettati) and Sarah Wendt. We welcome papers engaging with any of the following (and associated) topics, in relation to poetry, literature, theatre, opera, music, cinema or other visual arts: Continue reading

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ACIS Wellington 2019

ACIS Conference Wellington 2019 delegates at the Te Herenga Waka Marae, Victoria University Kelburn campus (this and all photos of the Pōwhiri are by Colin McDiarmid, Victoria University of Wellington)

Despite Wellington being touted as the windiest city in the world, the elements were gentle on the 80 participants who flew in from across the world to take part in the 10th biennial ACIS Conference, Navigazioni possibili: Italies Lost and Found at Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand. Many congratulations to Sally Hill and Claudia Bernardi for hosting a delightful, stimulating, and welcoming ACIS conference. It was a conference which witnessed several firsts: our first ACIS group photograph; our first traditional Maori pōwhiri at the Te Herenga Waka Marae on the university’s Kelburn campus; and the first ACIS keynote lecture delivered barefoot within a marae. Being greeted individually with the hongi set the tone for what was to follow – stimulating conversations, keynotes, and individual papers delivered in an atmosphere of great collegiality which demonstrated quite clearly that Italian Studies in Australasia are flourishing. It was also announced that ACIS 2021, the celebration of twenty years of ACIS’s foundation, will be held in the location of its inaugural conference at the Australian National University, Canberra and will be hosted by Susanna Scarparo and Josh Brown – watch this space.

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‘An Eye on Italy’: analysing Italian visual culture

A selection of papers from a conference in Adelaide in late 2016, An Eye on Italy: Continuities and transformations in Italian visual culture, has just been published in the online journal FULGOR (vol.5, no.3, June 2018). As the editors (Luciana d’Arcangeli, Sally Hill and Claire Kennedy) note, the theme of violence recurs in most of the papers: Claudia Bernardi’s analysis of Fernando Di Leo’s adaptation of Scerbanenco’s I ragazzi del massacro (1968); Luciana d’Arcangeli’s examination of the place of women in Matteo Garrone’s noir films; Brigid Maher’s exploration of the representation in the film and comic-book versions of Massimo Carlotto’s Arrivederci amore, ciao; and Barbara Pezzotti’s comparison of the film and tv versions of Giancarlo De Cataldo’s Romanzo criminale (2002), focusing on the representation of the Bologna station massacre of 1980. The issue, all of which is directly accessible, is completed by Sally Hill’s consideration of the relation between maternity and disability in recent Italian films and by a short interview with De Cataldo.

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ACIS Conference, Victoria University of Wellington, 7-10 February 2019

The conference pages for the ACIS 10th Biennial Conference at Victoria University of Wellington, NZ, 7-10 February 2019 are available here. They provide details for submission of the paper proposals, registration and accommodation in Wellington. The deadline for submission of paper and panel proposals has been extended until 30 July 2018. Confirmed keynote speakers with the titles of their papers are as follows:

Adalgisa Giorgio (University of Bath), ‘Antipodean navigations. Transitions and transformations among the Italian community in Wellington’.
Elizabeth Horodowich (New Mexico State University), ‘Amerasia: Marco Polo and Italian Consciousness in the First Global Age
Mark Seymour (University of Otago), ‘Navigating Emotions from Modern Australasia to 19th-Century Italy

Anyone with an urgent query is very welcome to contact Sally Hill or Claudia Bernardi from the organising committee via the Conference email.

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10th Biennial ACIS Conference: 7-10 February 2019, Victoria University of Wellington

The 10th ACIS Biennial Conference will take place on 7-10 February 2019 at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, on the theme Navigazioni possibili: Italies Lost and Found. Separated by oceans and continents, with profoundly different cultures, histories and languages, what connects Italy, its antipodes, and points in between? Even within Italy, how do those who inhabit the peninsula also inhabit its many pasts? What does it mean to navigate these spatial and temporal distances and how might we reimagine Italian Studies and its cultural, historical and linguistic reference points across them? The organisers invite paper and panel proposals that consider these and related questions from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives within the broad field of Italian Studies. Continue reading

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Religion, translation, Orientalists, purity and danger: ACIS in Prato

The keynote speakers at the ACIS Prato conference in July have very generously allowed us access to the videos of their presentations. Maurizio Isabella (QMUL), In the name of God: religion, popular mobilization and the culture wars of Italy and the Mediterranean, 1790-1860 ca, viewable here, underlines the essential role played by religion in both revolutionary and counter-revolutionary communities of mobilisation. Pierangela Diadori (Università per Stranieri di Siena), Multiculturality and inclusion through plurilingual public signs in contemporary Italy, linked here, offers a guide to the ways in which translation issues surface in public signs in multicultural Italy. Barbara Spackman (UC Berkeley) tracks the careers of two rackety but enterprising Italians, in Egypt by desertion or misadventure, in her Accidental Orientalists: Nineteenth-Century Italian Travelers in Egypt (here). And Nicholas Terpstra (University of Toronto) describes the forms of discipline and exclusion developed to ward off the dangers of impurity in Religious Refugees in the Early Modern Period:  Faith, Identity, and Purification in the Italian Context (here).  The abstracts for their talks can be found by reading on … Continue reading

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ACIS 9th Biennial Conference, Prato, 4-7 July 2017

The programme for the ACIS 9th Biennial ConferenceScontri e incontri: The dynamics of Italian transcultural exchanges, to be held at the Monash Centre in Prato, 4-7 July 2017, is now available here and via our Conferences menu. Further details – location, keynote speakers, accommodation in Prato – are available via the Conference home page on the Monash University site.

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Reminders: ACIS deadlines in October

????????????????????????????????????Just reminders for a couple of approaching deadlines. The applications for the ACIS Cassamarca scholarships for postgraduate research in Italy in 2017 are due by FRIDAY 14 OCTOBER. And the proposals for panels and papers for the  ACIS 9th Biennial Conference in 2017 at Monash Prato must be submitted to the organisers (details on the conference page HERE) by MONDAY 31 OCTOBER. Two proposed panels at the conference have also called for further submissions as soon as possible. ‘From Iamsilla to Ferrante: Anonymity and Pseudonymity in Italian Literature’ will investigate anonymity as a complex cultural and social convention, and address methodological issues connected with studying texts without the mediation of the ‘author’: send title, abstract and brief bio to Andrea Rizzi. And the organisers of the panel on  ‘Crossing Points & Subversion’ have called for further submissions (title, abstract, bio) to be sent to Gregoria Manzin and  Mark Nicholls. And applications for the Monash position (Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor) in Italian Studies close on SUNDAY 30 OCTOBER.
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9th Biennial ACIS Conference: Monash Prato, 4-7 July 2017

 

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The 9th Biennial ACIS conference, Scontri e incontri: the dynamics of Italian transcultural exchanges, hosted in association with the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University, will be held at the Monash University Centre in Prato, Italy, on 4-7 July 2017. The conference will explore sites of contact, connection and exchange in the Italian context. Some can be understood as open sites of interaction and juxtaposition in which people, goods and ideas from across the globe come and go and which are shaped by important trajectories of trade or distinctive histories of colonialism, imperialism or globalisation. When encounters occur in contexts of asymmetrical relations of power, no exchange or contact is present without an inherent confrontation. Language is used to create or manipulate perceptions that are formed when worlds collide. It turns contact into an uneven exchange, such as colonisation, modern warfare and even gender relations. What are the repercussions of such uneven exchanges? How can examining these notions and their representations help illuminate common debates around identity (politics), ideology, globalisation and crisis, human rights, memory and history, the environment, and individual bodies, among others? Conversely, how can we better understand the potential of modern diasporas to connect cultures and lead to collaboration and renewal, through the establishment of wider-ranging networks and positive forms of exchange? The organisers are now calling for paper and panel proposals, to be submitted here, by 31 October 2016.

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