Category Archives: Politics

Dante, Petrarch, Machiavelli, Pirandello: Remo Bodei in Melbourne and Sydney

imagesThe philosopher Remo Bodei will be giving talks in Melbourne and Sydney in March. Time, eternity, history: Dante, Petrarch, Machiavelli is the title of his talk (in English) at the Italian Cultural Institute, 233 Domain Rd, South Yarra, on Thursday 9 March at 6.30pm (free, booking essential). On Friday March 10, at Co.As.It. – Museo Italiano, 199 Faraday Street, Carlton, he will be talking (in Italian) on Pirandello e la dissoluzione della personalità (free, booking essential), a lecture to mark the 150th anniversary of Pirandello’s birth. He will also be giving this talk in Sydney on 13 March, 4 – 5.30pm, in the Dept of Italian at the University of Sydney (registration here). On March 15, 6 – 7.30pm, he will talk on Memory and Forgetting: A Conflicting Complicity at the State Library of New South Wales (Metcalfe Auditorium, Macquarie Building: information for registration here) . For details of the contents of the talks Continue reading

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La storia intorno alle foibe

giorno-del-ricordo-febbraio-2017-600x412Istituito nel 2004 il Giorno del ricordo del 10 febbraio, data del trattato di pace del 1947 che assegnò all’allora Jugoslavia l’Istria e la maggior parte della Venezia Giulia,  vuole conservare ‘la memoria della tragedia degli italiani e di tutte le vittime delle foibe, dell’esodo dalle loro terre degli istriani, fiumani e dalmati nel secondo dopoguerra e della più complessa vicenda del confine orientale’. In cosa consiste la ‘più complessa vicenda’? Per la rivista Internazionale il collettivo Nicoletta Bourbaki ha chiesto a sette storici di rispondere alla domanda; le loro risposte, affrontando gli aspetti storici, sociali e politici dei conflitti e delle loro memorializzazioni, si trovano qui.

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Shirley Hazzard (Sydney 1931 – New York 2016)

Brigitta Olubas   University of New South Wales

220px-shirley_hazzard_australian_writer_mercantile_library_for_fiction_benefit_awards_dinner_october_29_2007_photo_by_christopher_petersonShirley Hazzard was an author admired for the self-reflectiveness, delicacy of phrasing, wit and irony, intensely personal resonance and finely realised sense of place which characterised both her fictional and non-fictional writings. Italy played a fundamental part in her life and work. Her first year there, 1956, was spent in Tuscany where she established a close friendship with the Vivante family, artists, philosophers and writers, and developed the penetrating eye into social relationships of love and loss analysed in her novels set in Italy and elsewhere. She returned regularly to Naples and to Capri for the rest of her life and was made an honorary citizen of Capri in 2000. She often underlined her debt to Italy: “From the first day (in Naples), everything changed. I was restored to life and power and thought.” The point was never simply personal but rather bound to the persistence of humanist art and thought there: “In Italy, the mysteries remain important: the accidental quality of existence, the poetry of memory, the impassioned life that is animated by awareness of eventual death. There is still synthesis, rather than formula. There is still expressive language.”   Continue reading

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Ministro o ministra? Sindaco o sindaca?

bg_articolo_standard-1The 2016 issue of Gender/sexuality/Italy, an annual peer-reviewed journal which publishes research on gendered identities and the ways they intersect with and produce Italian politics, culture and society, is devoted to the question of language and gender. The editor, Nicoletta Marini-Maio, sets in a historical and linguistic context the issues raised by how to address the minister Maria Elena Boschi and the mayor of Rome Virginia Raggi. Other contributions include an analysis of the ways violence against women is presented in the media, the importance of gender, age and immediate context in determining variations between male and female language use, and a review of Over the Rainbow City. Towards a New LGBT Citizenship in Italy (2015) edited by Fabio Corbisiero.

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9th Biennial ACIS Conference: Monash Prato, 4-7 July 2017

 

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The 9th Biennial ACIS conference, Scontri e incontri: the dynamics of Italian transcultural exchanges, hosted in association with the School of Languages, Literatures, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash University and the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University, will be held at the Monash University Centre in Prato, Italy, on 4-7 July 2017. The conference will explore sites of contact, connection and exchange in the Italian context. Some can be understood as open sites of interaction and juxtaposition in which people, goods and ideas from across the globe come and go and which are shaped by important trajectories of trade or distinctive histories of colonialism, imperialism or globalisation. When encounters occur in contexts of asymmetrical relations of power, no exchange or contact is present without an inherent confrontation. Language is used to create or manipulate perceptions that are formed when worlds collide. It turns contact into an uneven exchange, such as colonisation, modern warfare and even gender relations. What are the repercussions of such uneven exchanges? How can examining these notions and their representations help illuminate common debates around identity (politics), ideology, globalisation and crisis, human rights, memory and history, the environment, and individual bodies, among others? Conversely, how can we better understand the potential of modern diasporas to connect cultures and lead to collaboration and renewal, through the establishment of wider-ranging networks and positive forms of exchange? The organisers are now calling for paper and panel proposals, to be submitted here, by 31 October 2016.

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Catholicism and politics after the DC

rmis20.v018.i02.coverThe latest issue of the Journal of Modern Italian Studies (vol.21, 3, 2016) has a set of articles on the nature of contemporary Catholicism and its relations to politics in Italy today. Did the election of Pope Francis mark a decisive shift in Catholic policy and practice, especially in the social field? How much and among whom does the call to preserve ‘Catholic values’, however understood, have force today?  To what extent has the Church developed a politically serviceable stance on the religious pluralism which comes with immigration and on the personal spirituality which follows institutional disaffection? Has the disappearance of Christian Democracy and the dispersal of its inheritance and inheritors across many parties destroyed any chance of the resurrection of political Catholicism?

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Climb every mountain: the life of Felice Benuzzi (1910-1988)

Rory Steele launchMelbourne’s Italian Institute of Culture and Connor Court Publishing will be launching The Heart and the Abyss – The Life of Felice Benuzzi by Rory Steele, who will be present for the occasion, on Thursday 18 August at 6 pm at the Italian Institute, 233 Domain Road, South Yarra (rsvp to Bruno Mascitelli or phone (03) 9214 5363). Felice Benuzzi (1910-1988) represented Italy as a swimmer (breaststroke), colonial adminstrator and diplomat. His best-known exploit, recounted in his No Picnic on Mount Kenya (1947) and here in an interview for the RAI (1987), was to break out of his POW camp in 1943 to scale the second-highest mountain in Africa, with no maps and only handmade gear, returning to the camp to report to a bemused British commandant seventeen days later (the col between Point Dutton and the Petit Gendarme on Mount Kenya was named Benuzzi Col in his honour). Decorated for bravery in combat, he served as consul in Berlin and ambassador to Uruguay, ending his career as Head of the Italian Delegation for the Antarctic. A passionate mountaineer, he was a founder-member of the environmental group Mountain Wilderness. The author of this biography, Rory Steele, was Australia’s ambassador to Italy 1997-2001.

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Machiavelli in the British Isles

PETRINA JKT(240x159)PATHIn the century before the first printed English translation of Machiavelli’s The Prince appeared in 1640, at least four translations in English had circulated in manuscript form. The only one which was not anonymous was produced in Scotland ‘virtuously and valiantlye  and with great and magnanime courage’ by William Fowler, poet, courtier and former spy who enjoyed the company of heretics and was therefore attracted to the task of diffusing a text under Papal ban. Alessandra Petrina (University of Padova), author of Machiavelli in the British Isles (Ashgate, 2009) will give a talk under that title, co-sponsored by the Museo Italiano and the Faculty of Arts of the University of Melbourne, at the Museo Italiano, 189 Faraday Street, Carlton, on Thursday, 22 September 2016 from 10:00 – 11.3oam. The talk will focus on Anglo-Italian relations in early modern Europe and the reception of a book that was often used as a tool to learn the Italian language. Professor Petrina will complement it with a session from 12:00 – 1:30pm providing a contemporary view on the teaching of English in primary and secondary schools in Italy.

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The Visible and the Invisible in Italian Culture

Vuw-logoThe History and Italian Programmes at Victoria University of Wellington invite papers for a two-day workshop, ‘The Visible and Invisible in Italian Culture, to be held on 8-9 July 2016.  John Foot (University of Bristol) will be the keynote speaker. The meeting aims to investigate how Italy has dealt with the ambiguities, anomalies and contradictions of its social and political life since Unification, and with how it has engaged, or failed to engage, the people at its margins. The organisers, Sally Hill and Giacomo Lichtner, welcome papers and/or panel submissions from a variety of disciplines and viewpoints, including comparative and transnational perspectives.

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Port of no return

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Michelle Saftich will present her historical novel, Port of No Return (Odyssey Books, 2015), at the Museo Italiano  199 Faraday Street, Carlton, at 6.30pm on 10 February 2016, to coincide with Italy’s Giorno del Ricordo (free event; booking here). The day remembers those Italians killed or forced to leave their homes when Yugoslavia claimed their territories in north-east Italy at the end of World War II. Saftich’s story based is on the experiences of her father and his family fleeing Fiume in 1945 and their years as displaced people in the aftermath of war in Europe. Continue reading

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