Category Archives: Film Theatre and Media

ACIS – Save Venice fellowships for 2019

ACIS is very pleased to announce that Jen McFarland and Emma Barron have been awarded ACIS – Save Venice Fellowships for 2019.

Jen McFarland’s project, Pizzochere and public presence in late fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Venice, is a study of pizzochere (lay religious women), examining their identity, social status, and activities and drawing on material in the Archivio Storico Patriarcale di Venezia and the Archivio di Stato di Venezia, as well as painting cycles in the Gallerie dell’Accademia. Pizzochere groups held a significant social and charitable function in sixteenth-century Venice, offering vital spaces of assistance and agency for women of varied (but mostly vulnerable) social backgrounds.

Emma Barron’s project, Popular access to ideas about the modern world through mass culture in post-war Italy, examines social change and media coverage of the Venice Art Biennale and Venice Film Festival in the late 1960s, using materials from the Archivio Storico della Biennale di Venezia, Archivio dello Stato and the Biblioteca della Fondazione Querini Stampalia. She will analyse ideas about Venice as a site of glamour, wealth and film-stars and the events that led to Venice becoming a site of protest during the 1968 student demonstrations at the 34th Venice Art Biennale and the 29th Venice Film Festival.

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ACIS scholarships for postgraduate research in Italy in 2020

ACIS is offering UP TO THREE scholarships worth $6,000 each to provide postgraduate students at an Australian or New Zealand university with the opportunity to work on a research project in Italy in 2020. For one of the awards, the Dino De Poli Scholarship, preference may be given to applications for research on any aspect of the culture, history and society of North East Italy. The scholarships are available to students who are currently enrolled, full-time or part-time, in Master by research or PhD degrees in a university in Australia or New Zealand and who are engaged in research projects in any of the following areas of Italian Studies: archaeology and classical antiquities, language, literature, culture, history, politics and society, including migration studies. Full details of the scholarships, eligibility, and the application process can be found here. The deadline for submission of applications is SUNDAY 13 OCTOBER 2019.

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Lavazza Film Festival 2019

Palace Cinemas ha annunciato alcuni degli highlight della ventesima edizione del Lavazza Film Festival dedicato al cinema italiano. A partire dal 17 settembre saranno presentati 26 tra i migliori film italiani recenti e alcune gemme del cinema classico, accompagnati da Special Presentations, aperitivi, ricevimenti e galà. Tra i film ci saranno Pavarotti di Ron Howard, Bangla, che racconta la storia di Phaim, un giovane musulmano di origini bengalesi nato in Italia, Momenti di trascurabile felicità di Daniele Luchetti, e anche una retrospettiva dedicata a Bernardo Bertolucci, che includerà Novecento e Il Conformista. Il Festival sarà presentato nelle seguenti città: Sydney (17 settembre – 16 ottobre), Melbourne (19 settembre – 16 ottobre), Canberra (24 settembre – 16 ottobre), Brisbane (25 settembre – 16 ottobre), Adelaide (1 – 23 ottobre), Perth (2 – 16 ottobre), Hobart (17 – 23 ottobre), e Byron Bay (26 settembre – 13 ottobre). Il programma completo (film, luoghi di presentazione, orari) sarà reso noto il 21 agosto.

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Andrea Camilleri (1925 – 2019)

Mercoledì mattina è mancato all’età di 93 anni Andrea Camilleri, regista, attore, docente, ma conosciuto soprattutto come creatore in più di venti libri del commissario Salvo Montalbano e delle sue indagini nella Sicilia sud-orientale. Sia in Italia che all’estero Camilleri ha goduto di uno straordinario successo editoriale, giunto in età avanzata (scrisse il suo primo romanzo con Montalbano quando aveva quasi 70 anni). In un’intervista a SBS Barbara Pezzotti (Monash University), analizzando i diversi motivi di quel successo, ha riassunto il carattere del protagonista così: “Il commissario Montalbano è un personaggio molto particolare: se pensiamo c’è tutta una tradizione del giallo in cui il detective è triste, isolato, preda a grande disperazione, molto spesso alcolizzato, tossicodipendente… qui invece ci troviamo di fronte ad un secondo filone della crime fiction, che è un filone in realtà moltissimo amato, che è dell’ispettore che ama la vita, pensiamo a Maigret per esempio, a Vásquez Montálban: è un ispettore che ama la vita, ama mangiare, ama la bellezza, ha molti difetti, quindi non è perfetto, non è atletico, non è un superuomo, quindi possiamo identificarci con lui… ma è fondamentalmente una persona onesta, a volte burbero, però ha una grande sensibilità e una grande empatia nell’affrontare le sue indagini”.

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Romantic adventures; the Free Cinema movement; and an 18th century duel

This week’s TLS (March 29) is a special issue devoted to European culture which includes three very informative pieces on Italian writers. David Robey reviews the first two volumes of the eventual four volumes on Emilio Salgari (1862-1911) by Ann Lawson Lucas. Salgari’s adventure romances, Robey suggests, all contain the defining features of the genre: ‘heroes of exceptional strength and prowess and heroines of remarkable beauty; idealised passionate love; plots made up of travel, chance events and physical conflict or struggle’ (features generated exclusively by Salgari’s imagination and his life in the library stacks since he never left Italy and had to spend all his time writing). Then Anna Coatman reviews the English translation of the lively London diaries of the film director Lorenza Mazzetti (she announced ‘I’m a genius’ when she first arrived at the Slade School of Fine Art from work on a potato farm and the Slade’s director invited her to come back the next day). She became one of the founders of the Free Cinema movement (‘Perfection is not an aim. An attitude means a style. A style means an attitude’) along with Karel Reisz, Lindsay Anderson and Tony Richardson. Finally, Joseph Farrell describes the duel (‘Pistols for two and coffee for one’) fought, or at least performed, in 1766 between Giacomo Casanova and Count Franciszek Branicki. Branicki was the more seriously wounded but the duellists continued to exchange good wishes daily for their respective recoveries.

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INDELIBLE / INDELEBILE – NEW DEADLINE OF THE CALL FOR PAPERS

The new deadline for the submission of paper proposals to the international Interdisciplinary conference, INDELIBLE / INDELEBILE  – Representation in the arts of (in)visible violence against women and their resistance, supported by ACIS on 23-25 October 2019 at Flinders University in Adelaide (South Australia), is 30 March 2019 (details for submissions below). Our interdisciplinary conference aims to contribute to the ‘glocal’ conversation on the topic of gendered violence and at the same time raise awareness of the global extent of the problem by analysing ways in which both such violence and resistance to it are represented in the arts. While a key strand of the conference will concern the arts in contemporary Italy, its scope will be broad, encouraging comparison with other societies across space and time. Keynote speakers will be Dacia Maraini (accompanied by a performance of her Passi affrettati) and Sarah Wendt. We welcome papers engaging with any of the following (and associated) topics, in relation to poetry, literature, theatre, opera, music, cinema or other visual arts: Continue reading

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CIVIL SOCIETY AND RECONCILIATION. VOICES FROM POST-WAR JAPAN, GER­MANY, AND ITALY

22 September 1984

Lasting reconciliation with former enemies after a war is a difficult and distressing process. Yet, beyond the war crimes trials, public discussion of Sec­ond World War crimes in West Germany, Italy and Japan in the post-war period was extremely sparse. Controversies over the responsibilities for key events remain today. CO.AS.IT, in collaboration with the University of Melbourne, will host, as a free event, a discussion of the project Civil Society and Reconciliation introduced by its directors Claudia Astarita and Akihiro Ogawa (Asia Institute, The University of Melbourne) on Thursday 28 March 2019, 6.30-8pm at 199 Faraday Street, Carlton, VIC, followed by the screening of the project’s documentary and remarks by Riccardo Brizzi (University of Bologna) and Laura Fontana (European Holocaust Research Infrastructure, Paris). Their descriptions of their own work can be found here.    Continue reading

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‘VOGLIAMO ANCHE LE ROSE’

In partnership with the Italian Cultural Institute and Artist Film Workshop, Co.As.It. will present a screening of Vogliamo anche le rose on Friday 15 February 2019, 6:30pm, 199 Faraday Street, Melbourne (free event, RSVP here). The film’s director, Alina Marazzi, known for her explorations of the intricacies of female subjectivity, motherhood and memory, will be present to talk about her work. Her first feature-length film, Un’ora sola ti vorrei  (2002), is a documentary she made about her mother who took her own life when Alina was four years old, told through her mother’s diaries and home movie footage in the Italy of the 1960s and 1970s. Vogliamo anche le rose (2007) is organised around accounts by three very different women, Anita, Teresa and Valentina, who feel themselves similarly socially and culturally displaced in the 1970s. The film is a penetrating critique of the Italian family life of the time and of the expectations on women to be efficient mothers, obedient wives and virtuous daughters.

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Awards for Jo-Anne Duggan Prize 2019

ACIS is delighted to congratulate the winners of the Jo-Anne Duggan Prize for 2019 for Best Essay, Best Creative Work, and Highly Recommended. Rory McKenzie (PhD candidate, VUW, New Zealand) has been awarded the Best Essay prize for his project entitled ‘A translation stalemate: The Dark Horse in Italian‘.  Valentina Maniacco (PhD candidate, Griffith University) has been awarded the Best Creative Work prize for her entry ‘Translating the allusions in Tito Maniacco’s Mestri di mont (2007)’. And Nicole Townsend (PhD candidate, UNSW) has been Highly Recommended for her essay entry ‘The ‘enemy other’: Identity and belonging within the Italian-Australian community during the Second World War‘. The abstracts for each of the three entries can be found on the Winners page under Prize on our main menu above.

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Addio Bernardo Bertolucci (1941-2018)

Gino Moliterno   ANU

Now, with the ranks of veteran Italian film directors already depleted to single figures, Bernardo Bertolucci, in the words of Roberto Benigni “il più grande di tutti, l’ultimo imperatore del cinema italiano”, has also left us. Undoubtedly a giant not only of Italian but of world cinema, Bertolucci succeeded, in a career that spanned six decades and produced close to 20 major films, to achieve the almost impossible feat of moving with ease between an auteurist arthouse, at times even jarringly experimental, cinema and commercially successful big-budget Hollywood-financed mass entertainment. And perhaps what especially endeared him to Italians was that he managed to achieve full citizenship of the international community of world cinema without renouncing his social and cultural roots in provincial Italy. Continue reading

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