Category Archives: Education

Spaghetti/Knödel in the South Tyrol

280px-Language_distribution_in_South_Tyrol,_Italy_2011,_enSouth Tyrol, situated on the border between Austria and Italy, has been considered a ‘peace model’ by many nation-states since the creation of the province’s autonomy statutes. The aim of those statutes was to allow for minority protection of the German- and Ladin-speaking communities while also permitting Austria to be the ‘protector’ of South Tyrol even though the province is situated in Italy. A by-product of the statutes was the creation of the ‘separate but equal’ education system, which allowed the German-, Italian- and Ladin-speaking communities to have individual schools in order to protect their culture and language identity. In recent years marriages between members of different language groups have increased and a requirement for applicants for certain civil service positions to have an adequate comprehension of the L2 or in some cases L3 has been imposed. In ‘Half spaghetti-half Knödel: cultural division through the lens of language learning‘ Anne Wand has examined how the South Tyrolean school system has coped with the changing circumstances and with the pressures to move to an increasingly bilingual society. 

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Access Granted: Modern Languages and Issues of Accessibility at University

Josh Brown/Marinella Caruso   UWA

imagesDiscussion about how to monitor and increase participation in languages study has been growing in the UK, the US and Australia, particularly in higher education. Levels of enrolment in modern languages at universities around the world have come to be described in terms of ‘crisis’ or even ‘permanent crisis’. In Australia the new degree structures implemented by the University of Melbourne in 2008 and the University of Western Australia in 2012 have bucked this trend. The reforms introduced by those two universities have led to unprecedented levels of enrolment in languages, and are the focus of current research we are undertaking at UWA. The question of how to increase access to language study will be the subject of an article to appear in the journal Language Learning in Higher Education later this year.

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Enfilade, Venetian Painting, Remembering David Rosand

Sally Grant   New York

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Here is an item from a recent issue of the newsletter Enfilade that will interest ACIS readers (Enfilade is edited by the tireless and ineffably charming Craig Hanson who keeps everyone in eighteenth-century studies, especially art and architecture, informed about what is going on in the way of exhibitions, conferences and publications). It signals the opening this week of a Venetian painting exhibition, In Light of Venice: Venetian Painting in Honor of David Rosand, at the Otto Naumann Gallery, New York, which lasts until 12 February 2016. The title recalls the distinguished art historian of Renaissance Venice who died in 2014 and in whose honour a new Italian professorship is to be established at Columbia University. Some of the profits from the exhibition will be donated to the David Rosand Tribute Fund at the university to support the position.

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Italian cinema studies: position in Toronto

cropped-Img042-e1358230241298The Department of Italian Studies and the Cinema Studies Institute at the University of Toronto invites applications for a tenure-stream position in the field of Italian Cinema. The position will be at the rank of Assistant Professor commencing, July 1, 2016. The University of Toronto faculty appointments will be to the Department of Italian Studies (67%) and Cinema Studies Institute (33%). We are seeking a scholar whose major field of research is Italian Cinema and Modern Literature (19th and 20th centuries) and who has a proven record of publications in the field of Italian Cinema Studies. The successful candidate will be expected to teach courses at both graduate and undergraduate levels in the above mentioned areas in both Units as well as Italian language courses. An active research interest in 19th-20th-century Italian Literature and in Language Teaching and Learning would be regarded as a special asset. The candidate must have excellent oral and written Italian language skills. Continue reading

Associate Lecturer in Italian Studies: La Trobe University

logoLa Trobe University (Melbourne, Australia) invites applications for the position of Associate Lecturer in Italian Studies. This is a full-time continuing teaching & research position within the Department of Language and Linguistics. La Trobe’s Italian program combines beginner to advanced language studies with the study of Italian culture, literature, cinema, history and translation. In addition to learning the language, students become familiar with cultural life in contemporary Italy as well as historical perspectives on the country. The position description, including key areas of accountability and key selection criteria, as well as information on how to apply, is available here. Enquiries should be directed to Dr Brigid Maher.

The closing date is Thursday 28 May 11.55pm (Australian Eastern Standard Time)

Il Paroliere: Italian Word of the Week-64

220px-Telemachus_and_Mentor1‘Oi, Ody, wind’s up.’ ‘Yeah, get the boat out then and drag that idle bunch of sailorin’ no-goods out of the tavern. And tell Penny to pack us some sangers and the cab sav.’ ‘Where we going, Ody?’ ‘Back of Bourke, mate, Troy or somethin’, bloke said.’ ‘Whatya gonna do with young Tele then?’ ‘Strewth, mate, I dunno. Concetta, ya got any ideas?’

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Conferenza d’italianistica 2014

Barbara Pezzotti    ACIS

Daniela Cavallaro (Università di Auckland) segnala un interessante convegno di italianistica, intitolato “ITALIANISTICA 2.0” che si terrà a Banja Luka (Bosnia ed Erzegovina) il  5-7 giugno 2014. Ecco il link e alcune informazioni al riguardo.

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Invitation to become a member of LCNAU

logo-header-lcnau-dsLCNAU (Languages and Cultures Network for Australian Universities) works hard to support all languages and languages academics in the tertiary sector. In 2013 LCNAU provided significant support to protect programs and academics across Australia, including at Curtin University and University of Canberra. The challenges facing tertiary language programs are diverse, and we are keen to listen and respond to the issues. To maintain our work we are now inviting you to become a member of our network.

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Language Interactions In Early Modern Europe

threedoorsThis conference, organized by Villa I Tatti and Monash University Prato Center, to be held on 21 November (I Tatti) and 22 November (Monash), explores the complex interactions between Latin and the vernacular in the context of early modern European medicine, philosophy, history, architecture, and rhetoric. For centuries, Latin was the lingua franca for science and the humanities, but in the course of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries vernacular languages competed for equivalent status. This conference is the first to take a pan-European look at the history of the relationship between Latin and the vernacular through the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Emerging and established scholars from diverse backgrounds will discuss the rich relationship between these languages building bridges between disciplines and methodologies.

The conference is free and open to all scholars, but RSVP
. For the program, see below. For abstracts, click here.

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Autobiographies

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John Burrow

Autobiographies are a far less popular genre in Italy than in the Anglo-American world, as Peter Hainsworth and Martin McLaughlin (2007: 1, 9) note. And the one I am about to signal has only passing references to Italy so I have to apologise for stretching the boundaries of what visitors to this site would expect to find here. But the autobiography by the intellectual historian John Burrow who died in 2009 is so full of subtle portraits, colour and wit and can only be found rather far off the normal search track that I thought it would be worth flagging here. Since his last major work, A History of Histories (2007), contains substantial sections on Ancient Rome’s historians and on Villani, Machiavelli and Guicciardini, his autobiography also provides an unmissable insight into the ingredients which went into his approach to them. The title he chose, Memories Migrating, suggests a resonance with Australian experiences even though the only mention of this country is a brief allusion to his tenure of a visiting fellowship at the ANU in 1983. An equally well-hidden autobiography by another historian, Patrick Collinson, a contemporary of Burrow, has an engaging chapter on the author’s time in Sydney University’s Department of History in the early 1970s. (DM)

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