Category Archives: Education

CIVIL SOCIETY AND RECONCILIATION. VOICES FROM POST-WAR JAPAN, GER­MANY, AND ITALY

22 September 1984

Lasting reconciliation with former enemies after a war is a difficult and distressing process. Yet, beyond the war crimes trials, public discussion of Sec­ond World War crimes in West Germany, Italy and Japan in the post-war period was extremely sparse. Controversies over the responsibilities for key events remain today. CO.AS.IT, in collaboration with the University of Melbourne, will host, as a free event, a discussion of the project Civil Society and Reconciliation introduced by its directors Claudia Astarita and Akihiro Ogawa (Asia Institute, The University of Melbourne) on Thursday 28 March 2019, 6.30-8pm at 199 Faraday Street, Carlton, VIC, followed by the screening of the project’s documentary and remarks by Riccardo Brizzi (University of Bologna) and Laura Fontana (European Holocaust Research Infrastructure, Paris). Their descriptions of their own work can be found here.    Continue reading

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Learning Italian in Australia

This month Channel View Publications/Multilingual Matters is publishing Identity Trajectories of Adult Second Language Learners: Learning Italian in Australia by Cristiana Palmieri (Italian Studies, University of Sydney). The book explores the motivations of adult second language (L2) learners to learn Italian in continuing education settings in Australia. It focuses on their motivational drives, learning trajectories and related dynamics of identity development triggered by the learning process. Also discussed is the role played by the Italian migrant community in Australia in making Italian a sought-after language to learn, highlighting the importance of taking account of L2 learning contexts. This link indicates the book’s contents and the positive international reviews it has received.

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ACIS postgraduate scholarships for 2019

ACIS is delighted to congratulate the three winners of the ACIS Cassamarca postgraduate scholarships for research in Italy in 2019. Julia Pelosi-Thorpe (MA, Italian Studies (University of Melbourne) awarded the Dino De Poli Scholarship for her project ‘Imitate da Ovidio: gender ventriloquism in the seicento epistole eroiche’; Andrea Pagani (PhD, Literary and Cultural Studies, Monash University) for ‘Beyond Pinocchio: Italian National Identity in Carlo Collodi’s Works for Primary Schools (1877-1890)’; and Margherita Angelucci (PhD, Literary and Cultural Studies, Monash University) for ‘A New Way of Being Italian through the Lens of Hip Hop’. The abstracts for each project will be available shortly on the Winners page on our Scholarships menu.

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Ricordando Maria Bentivoglio

Laura Mecca racconta qui la vita di Maria (poi Marie) Bentivoglio. Italiana, nata a Torino nel 1898, emigrata in Australia ancora in fasce, Maria si laureò a Sydney in chimica e geologia e nel 1921 fu la prima donna australiana a ricevere una borsa di studio all’Università di Oxford dove ottenne un DPhil. Dopo, la sua vita fu dedicata allo studio, all’insegnamento (universitario ma anche corsi di inglese per gli immigrati italiani in New South Wales) e alla ricerca. Teneva corsi di lezioni all’Università di Sydney e in diverse università statunitensi. Nel 1936 si stabilì a New York con il marito appena sposato (di origini nobili da San Remo) dove rimase, lavorando nell’industria chimica, per vent’anni. Tornò prima in Italia e poi, dopo la morte del marito nel 1961, in Australia. Nel 1994, a novantasei anni, in riconoscimento dell’importanza delle sue ricerche le fu conferito un dottorato onorario di ricerca dall’Università di Sydney. Un suo ritratto, opera di Antonio Dattilo-Rubbo, è esposto alla Manly Art Gallery.

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Spaghetti/Knödel in the South Tyrol

280px-Language_distribution_in_South_Tyrol,_Italy_2011,_enSouth Tyrol, situated on the border between Austria and Italy, has been considered a ‘peace model’ by many nation-states since the creation of the province’s autonomy statutes. The aim of those statutes was to allow for minority protection of the German- and Ladin-speaking communities while also permitting Austria to be the ‘protector’ of South Tyrol even though the province is situated in Italy. A by-product of the statutes was the creation of the ‘separate but equal’ education system, which allowed the German-, Italian- and Ladin-speaking communities to have individual schools in order to protect their culture and language identity. In recent years marriages between members of different language groups have increased and a requirement for applicants for certain civil service positions to have an adequate comprehension of the L2 or in some cases L3 has been imposed. In ‘Half spaghetti-half Knödel: cultural division through the lens of language learning‘ Anne Wand has examined how the South Tyrolean school system has coped with the changing circumstances and with the pressures to move to an increasingly bilingual society. 

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Access Granted: Modern Languages and Issues of Accessibility at University

Josh Brown/Marinella Caruso   UWA

imagesDiscussion about how to monitor and increase participation in languages study has been growing in the UK, the US and Australia, particularly in higher education. Levels of enrolment in modern languages at universities around the world have come to be described in terms of ‘crisis’ or even ‘permanent crisis’. In Australia the new degree structures implemented by the University of Melbourne in 2008 and the University of Western Australia in 2012 have bucked this trend. The reforms introduced by those two universities have led to unprecedented levels of enrolment in languages, and are the focus of current research we are undertaking at UWA. The question of how to increase access to language study will be the subject of an article to appear in the journal Language Learning in Higher Education later this year.

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Enfilade, Venetian Painting, Remembering David Rosand

Sally Grant   New York

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Here is an item from a recent issue of the newsletter Enfilade that will interest ACIS readers (Enfilade is edited by the tireless and ineffably charming Craig Hanson who keeps everyone in eighteenth-century studies, especially art and architecture, informed about what is going on in the way of exhibitions, conferences and publications). It signals the opening this week of a Venetian painting exhibition, In Light of Venice: Venetian Painting in Honor of David Rosand, at the Otto Naumann Gallery, New York, which lasts until 12 February 2016. The title recalls the distinguished art historian of Renaissance Venice who died in 2014 and in whose honour a new Italian professorship is to be established at Columbia University. Some of the profits from the exhibition will be donated to the David Rosand Tribute Fund at the university to support the position.

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Invitation to become a member of LCNAU

logo-header-lcnau-dsLCNAU (Languages and Cultures Network for Australian Universities) works hard to support all languages and languages academics in the tertiary sector. In 2013 LCNAU provided significant support to protect programs and academics across Australia, including at Curtin University and University of Canberra. The challenges facing tertiary language programs are diverse, and we are keen to listen and respond to the issues. To maintain our work we are now inviting you to become a member of our network.

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Autobiographies

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John Burrow

Autobiographies are a far less popular genre in Italy than in the Anglo-American world, as Peter Hainsworth and Martin McLaughlin (2007: 1, 9) note. And the one I am about to signal has only passing references to Italy so I have to apologise for stretching the boundaries of what visitors to this site would expect to find here. But the autobiography by the intellectual historian John Burrow who died in 2009 is so full of subtle portraits, colour and wit and can only be found rather far off the normal search track that I thought it would be worth flagging here. Since his last major work, A History of Histories (2007), contains substantial sections on Ancient Rome’s historians and on Villani, Machiavelli and Guicciardini, his autobiography also provides an unmissable insight into the ingredients which went into his approach to them. The title he chose, Memories Migrating, suggests a resonance with Australian experiences even though the only mention of this country is a brief allusion to his tenure of a visiting fellowship at the ANU in 1983. An equally well-hidden autobiography by another historian, Patrick Collinson, a contemporary of Burrow, has an engaging chapter on the author’s time in Sydney University’s Department of History in the early 1970s. (DM)

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Parents, children and responsibility in Italy

Angela Biscaldi   University of Milan

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“la mamma mi sgrida soprattutto quando lei parla al telefono e io continuo a chiamarla” (bambino di 5 anni)

How do Italians understand their role as parents? What kinds of values do they seek to inculcate in their children?  I devised a research project to try to address these questions, making the concept of ‘parental responsibility’ my key focus. I wanted to explore how important the term was to parents today and how far they tried to make their children aware of their own responsibilities (and what kind they were). I used the town of Cremona as a case-study, interviewing kindergarten teachers and parents with children under six years old, and analysing more than a thousand drawings by young children of family life situations.

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